The heart in Ikast

Listen to your heart

The Heart in Ikast

by C.F. Møller Architects

A new meeting point

C.F. Møller Architects is behind a major project next to the International School Ikast-Brande with a much-awaited expansion with several halls, multi-functional and educational facilities. The project called The Heart makes the educational facilities at the school even better, and at the same time creates a new meeting point centred on an area of fast growth in Ikast.

’Hjertet’ (the Heart), as the project is called, includes a multi-purpose building, as well as an activity park, to create a new relation to the neighbouring Business College HHX Ikast, Ikast Brande upper secondary school, the teacher training college, and the International School Ikast-Brande, which was also designed by C.F. Møller.

Architects

Europaplads 2, 11.
8000 Aarhus C
Denmark

Client & User

35 user groups

‘The Heart’ combines education, activities, community, exercise and recreational pursuits in new ways. The international pupils will thus be a natural part of a very wide-ranging group of users, including sportsmen and women, musicians, skaters and users in a social psychiatry project. Overall, 35 user groups were involved in the development of the building and park.

The aim of the Heart is to combine many different facilities and parallel activities, and to use all of the rooms, all the time, all day long, so that the building is always used actively from early morning to late evening – expressed in an architecture that resembles a small town, with varying roof heights and a square which gathers, leads and distributes the users.

Address

Hjertet
Vestergade 65
7430 Ikast
Denmark

Aerial view

Central square & streets sports hall

The Heart covers 3,660 m² in total, and features a central square with a performance stage. The square distributes users out to the various rooms in the multi-building.

One wing holds the school’s teaching rooms, which in the afternoons and evenings can be changed to multi-rooms and art workshops for associations and evening schools.

For young people and younger sports enthusiasts, the street sports hall is particularly interesting, as it is designed so as to retain a sense of being outdoors.

There is also a café with a service kitchen, and a shop area where organic groceries from a local socio-economic initiative as well as handicraft by blind producers can be sold.

On the first floor of the multi-building there are various large and small rooms for relaxed movement activities such as dance and yoga, as well as cultural events and performance culture, and counselling services for young people in the municipal Youth and Education Advisory Centre.

Feedback

2 + 10 =

Accessible activities

The surrounding activities landscape is designed around sustainable drainage principles and includes very active pursuits such as a skate bowl and flowskate parc, a cycle pump-track, parkour facilities and playgrounds, beach volley pits and a multi-use playing field; as well as more quiet and shared activities such as spots for petanque, picnics and campfires.

The Heart is a very open and accessible building, which also draws attention through its use of many small, informal venues and seating areas, to reinforce the multi-building’s capacity as a social gathering point that is not just a place to spend active leisure time.

In its essence the project is a showcase in how broadly different user groups of leisure facilities can be combined.

Opening

2018

Photographs

Text

C.F. Møller Architects

Pursuing active and social lives

The Heart will give a great boost to leisure time activities, local socioeconomics and teaching opportunities for the school. This also creates a strong contact between the many different users where the young people for instance can obtain advice on important life choices to pursue active and social lives. In this way the Heart connects every walk of life to make it easier to make the next step for each individual.

Video

Partner

A number of local and national collaboration partners have joined the field to ensure the project in Ikast-Brande Municipality comes to fruition, including local businesses such as Bestseller, and major Danish foundations Realdania and the Danish Foundation for Culture and Sports Facilities. The Carlsberg Foundation has contributed integrated artworks for both the building and the site.

The floating floor plans and the resulting architecture are a perfect example of how very different user groups of sports and leisure facilities can be organised.

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About us

More Sports Media

Johannes Bühlbecker, founder

Johannes Bühlbecker is an architect and has worked, among others, for International Association for Sports and Leisure Facilities (IAKS) for 15 years – as editorial director of the renowned trade magazine “sb”, in the organisation and realisation of international architectural competitions with IOC and IPC, in trade fairs and conventions, as head of the “NRW Beratungsstelle Sportstätten“ (“NRW Advice Centre for Sports Facilities”) and as a lecturer at the German Sport University Cologne.

  • Dipl.-Ing. (engineering degree) Architect, TU Berlin
  • Longtime editorial head with “sb”, an international journal for the architecture of sports
  • Training in web design, online marketing, etc.
  • International architectural competitions with IOC and IPC
  • Trade fair and congress organisation
  • Head of the “NRW Beratungsstelle Sportstätten“ (“NRW Advice Centre for Sports Venues”)
  • Lecturer at the German Sport University Cologne
  • Planning of the Prussian Stadium in Münster (for großmann engineers, Göttingen)
  • Replanning a football stadium in Berlin-Köpenick
  • Numerous publications, i.a. “From Round Leather to Soap Bubbles – The Development of Football and its Architecture”
  • Board member and youth coach at SV BW Weitmar 09

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Clamart Sports Center

Unforseen curves

Clamart Sports Center near Paris

by Gaëtan Le Penhuel & Associés

About

Clamart Sports Center is made out of sustainable wood, tucked under a giant green roof. Designed by Gaetan Le Penhuel Architecture, the building houses four schools under a lush field and a huge curved wooden shell supported by structurally efficient laminated wooden beams.

The site is comprised of two main units: the sports complex, under a vast and unique metal envelope; and the school complex, protected by a landscaped plaza, and which is composed of four schools and their shared areas – lunchroom, recreation areas, a cultural center, and a multi-purpose hall with a separate entrance.

Sports complex

Clamart Sports Center is federated under a single and gigantic metallic envelope. Alternately dilated, dug or curved, as if deformed by the presence of its multiple functions – dojo, gymnasium, evolution area, tennis court – the building has however, nothing of a monolith. This amiable diplodocus is structured by a skeleton of glue-laminated wood, with very long-range.

The sports complex is composed of supple curves. Iimagined as a genuine sports city, its undulating standing seam aluminum envelope also meets the strict technical and aesthetic requirements for design. Touching the ground on its north and south façades, it protects the urban environment from noise pollution.

The continuous, hollowed shell housing the gymnasium, changing area, and a tennis court, contrasts with the flat green roof. Its laminated wood skeleton was built by Metsä Wood, a Finish manufacturer of sustainable wood products.

Schools

The four schools at Clamart Sports Center, mainly on the ground floor, are nestled under a vast carpet of greenery offering at the sight of the inhabitants an inaccessible raised square, but unifying. To orientate in this vast ensemble, volumes pierce and emerge from the broad vegetal plate, creating punctual double heights, spatial breaths, openings towards the sky, while pointing out the particular elements of the programs located at first floor.

This semi-intensive green roof, planted as a “flowering prairie,” also ensures excellent thermal insulation, hygrometric comfort, as well as optimal retention of rain water, thereby reducing runoff from the lot. Main bearings on this large site consist of volumes cut through this vast ensemble, emerging from the large green cover, creating occasional double height areas, areas of respiration, and openings toward the sky while also signaling the particular elements of the program located on the first floor.

Structure

The geometric complexity of the structure and the roof present interesting technical challenges. These led the architects to make the ambitious and original choice of utilizing cross-laminated timber for the roof’s complex wide span framework, thereby offering the possibility of making large-scale curved box girders.

The framework obtained with these large-scale girders creates a cover of approximately 40m x 100m extending from north to south, and joining the ground at either end where the roof gradually becomes the façade.

Exceptional

Clamart Sports Centre is really exceptional, not just because of its size but also because of its shape. With its curves, unusual dimensions and wide opening in the roof for the track and field area, very few pieces of wood used were identical. Due to its complex geometry, the roof and framework design of the Clamart Sports Centre posed advanced technical and aesthetic challenges, such as the double curve in certain areas of the roof.

The whole set, schools and sports complex, all in soft and undulating curves, creates a new peaceful artificial landscape embodying the ambition of a shared urban, social and educational environment, favourable to the well-being of its users.

Exterior views

Site & ground plan 

Sports complex

Section

School complex

Companies involved

Architect

Gaetan Le Penhueö & Associés Architectes
23, Rue de Clery
75002 Paris
France

Client & User

Budget

€30,700,000

Team

Gaétan Morales, Cristina Fernandez, Laetitia Biabaut

Companies involved

Opening

2016

Address

54 Rue de la Bourcillière
92140 Clamart
France

Photography

Author

Gaetan Le Penhueö & Associés Architectes

Video

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Campus Igara

Our city, our life

Campus Igara in Porto Alegre

Ospa Arquitetura e Urbanismo

About

Campus Igara is the sports education campus of Health Sciences Federal University of Porto Alegre (UFCSPA). Brazilian studio OSPA has won the architectural competition to design the site with a proposal that includes a floating football pitch.

OSPA Architecture and Urbanism’s “two-faced” design for the 25,000-square-metre campus houses classrooms, offices and other university facilities within a pair of high-rise blocks at the two ends of the site. Between these, the architects propose a series of basketball courts sheltered beneath the elevated football pitch.

The campus will be built in two phases, using a framework that combines steel and concrete elements. Students will move to the campus after the completion of stage one.

Our city, our life

One site, two faces. Two possibilities of connecting Campus Igara with the city. The concepts “front x back,” “public x services” was never an option. A longitudinal axis, accessible and inviting, connects the two faces – interfaces. Interfaces that despite the hierarchical distinction are equally necessary to the composition of the block, whose face today reveals the scars of our housing policy. Our city, our life. On the face of the buildings, the eyes of the city.

A public space

Campus Igara is more than a public institution, it will be a public space. This is the premise and guiding goal for the development of the Campus Igara of UFCSPA. In an urban context still growing, Campus Igara emerges as a potential articulating element of both spatial and human relationships that surrounds it. A square, fluid and permeable as is supposed to be, in contrast to the volumetric density that the programmatic solution suggests in a first approach.

Beyond academic activities

The program develops within the natural extension of the sidewalk. The open space articulates the campus’s functions far beyond the academic activities. The independent access, with independent controls for various uses also encourages diversity of users. Only two high buildings housing the university activities, the rest is square.

Molding memories

Good architecture as itself presupposes a proper solution of environmental variables, as well as their complementary systems. The buildings of Campus Igara are oriented to receive lower thermal load, proper ventilation and lighting of indoor sports facilities, which have been studied extensively. However, it is noteworthy the simplification of internal flows of the campus, being through open and inviting stairs when the vertical circulation is needed, as opposed to the use of elevators, or by the approximation of the other activities of the street level.

This second constitutes the imposing gesture of the project: the relationship between the main functions of a campus and areas of informal interaction and conviviality, which allow us to go beyond the technical degree. It molds personalities. After all, what are our memories from university time?

Exterior views

Ground plans

Sections

Impressions

Structure

Companies involved

Architect

Ospa Arquitetura e Urbanismo
Av. Osvaldo Aranha, 790/4ºandar
Porto Alegre – RS
Brasil

 

Client & User

Consultants

P790 Engenharias
STM Engenheiros Associados

Team

Carolina Souza Pinto, Lucas Obino, Cristiano Selbach Carneiro, Franco Miotto, Manoela Obino, Aline Taís Comiran, Ellen Renata Bernardi, Augusto Tumelero, Matheus Lorenzet

Companies involved

Address

Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre
Sarmento Leite
245 – Centro Histórico
Porto Alegre – RS, 90050-170
Brasil

Illustrations

OSPA Arquitetura e Urbanismo

Author

OSPA Arquitetura e Urbanismo

THE ARCHITECTS

About NORD Architects

NORD Architects was established in 2003 by founding partners Johannes Molander Pedersen and Morten Rask Gregersen (both b. 1974). Mia Baarup Tofte joined the partnership in 2017. During the years we have employed a multidisciplinary staff of urban planners, architects, landscape architects, process consultants, art historians, academics within social and cultural studies along with our technical staff. We are often asked to lecture and have been taking part in conferences, exhibiti­ons and publications on several occasions.

In recent years, we have designed and innovated welfare related projects in the healthcare sector as well as educational buildings, daycare centers, sports facilities and urban spaces. NORD Architects has experienced a growing international interest in the company’s unique approach to developing projects – as regards to strategic innovation as well as design.

ABOUT US

More Sports Media

About us

More Sports Media is the agency behind “More Sports. More Architecture.”  We offer support in all aspects of public relations work

If you do not have time to look after your publications, press releases or documentation, please give us a try. We know the industry – we have many years of experience.

Text, layout, graphics: One-stop shopping with More Sports Media – from the initial idea to the finished publication. We write, edit or translate your texts, photograph your projects, edit your pictures and plans or build your new homepage.

And More Sports Media ensures that the world knows about it: whether it be print or online, professional journal, portal or newsletter – we have know-how, experience and contacts to new and old media.

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Glass Mill Leisure Centre

Creating happiness

Glass Mill Leisure Centre in London

LA architects

About

Opened in 2013, Glass Mill Leisure Centre includes an 8 lane 25m competition pool, a teaching/learner pool, spectator seating, mobile floors for both pools and disabled lift with full access to the main pool. It also provides fitness and health suites, studios and associated changing rooms.

The exterior façade is clad in 1400 individual glass panels that were developed in conjunction with local artist Phil Coy.

Design brief

Glass Mill Leisure Centre at Lewisham was designed to integrate new public spaces within an urban residential development. Creating an attractive and welcoming sense of place for the community was at the core of the design brief and was a key driver for our design. 

The London Borough of Lewisham set out an urban regeneration site and established a competition to design and construct a new residential commercial and community area within the urban structure of Lewisham. The competition was won by Barratt East London and the development includes 760 apartments, a replacement of the London City Mission and the new community leisure facility.

Inside Glass Mill Leisure Centre

The interior constantly refers to the site and a high, beautiful entrance includes a restaurant and park terraces.

The main competition pool is an 8 lane, 25 meter environment with moveable floors; disabled lift access to enable access to as many of the residents as possible, no-one should be excluded from a community resource such as this and every effort has been made to make ‘The Glass Mill’ as inclusive as possible; spectator seating overlooks the pool area and below is the entrance to the changing areas.

An additional 20m learning/teaching pool also incorporates adjustable flooring and access to the wet and dry changing rooms. By the use of black out blinds this area can be made completely private for those who require it.

A full gym, sauna and steam room complement the Wellness & Treatment area along with additional facilities such as an 8.5m indoor climbing wall, two dance / exercise Studios with semi-sprung floors and air conditioning; a club room, meeting rooms and a crèche are also on site, having somewhere you trust to leave your children during a workout or swim is imperative and the crèche is invaluable in this regard.

1,400 coloured glass panels

The coloured external façade to Glass Mill Leisure Centre was designed in conjunction with Phil Coy, a local artist, to create the vibrancy that would be carried throughout the building. 1,400 coloured glass panels, back lit by LEDs, form a rain-screen that responds to external noise, through façade-mounted microphones, and the lights pulsate to follow the sounds. It represents in light and colour the living sounds of the community and the streets in which the building is located. The entrance/atrium façade is more subtle with etched glass brise soleil and double height curtain walling overlooking the Public realm of Plaza and Cornmill Gardens.  

Creating happiness

Glass Mill Leisure Centre is a building for the community and for the community’s regeneration; it is architecture that is designed to create happiness and provide an inclusive environment where self-respect and good feelings can develop.

This building is highly inclusive, sustainable and responsive to the needs and rhythm of the local community. It has a vibrancy and yet calmness that needs to be experienced rather than viewed. Glass Mill Leisure Centre was awarded the Mayor of London’s Best Community Building 2013/2014 in the London Planning Awards.

Exterior views

Ground floor plan 

Pools hall 

Gym and dance studios

Entrance area

Companies involved

Architect

LA architects
Brighton Road
Housedean Lewes
UK – Sussex BN7 3JW

Client

User

Team

Civil & Structural Engineering:
ATK Partnership

M&E Consultant:
Hoare Lea

Landscape Architects:
BDP

Project Manager & Quantity Surveyor:
Rider Levett Bucknall

Companies involved

Opening

2013

Address

Glass Mill Leisure Centre
41 Loampit Vale
UK – London SE13 7FT

Photography

Author

LA architects

Awards

Mayor of London’s Best Community Building 2013/2014
in the London Planning Awards

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About us

More Sports Media is the agency behind “More Sports. More Architecture.”  We offer support in all aspects of public relations work

If you do not have time to look after your publications, press releases or documentation, please give us a try. We know the industry – we have many years of experience.

Text, layout, graphics: One-stop shopping with More Sports Media – from the initial idea to the finished publication. We write, edit or translate your texts, photograph your projects, edit your pictures and plans or build your new homepage.

And More Sports Media ensures that the world knows about it: whether it be print or online, professional journal, portal or newsletter – we have know-how, experience and contacts to new and old media.

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Orestad Streethal

Small is beautiful

Ørestad Streethal in Copenhagen

NORD Architects

No limits

There are almost no limits on sport activities to throw yourself into in this 1,700 square metre sports centre placed in Ørestad, the southern part of Copenhagen. Ørestad Streethal is the smallest public building in this newly developed area. The sports facility is designed by NORD Architects in close co-creation with the users, to cater and promote informal sports activities.

Ørestad Streethal is developed and designed to be a vibrant urban space that creates new communities and social sustainability within the giant structures of the big buildings and long boulevards in Ørestad City.

Collaboration

The multi-purpose sports and community facility was developed through a process based on collaboration with a dedicated group of users, local stakeholders and inhabitants to cater specific local needs. During an open process in the early and developing phase, the architects facilitated workshops where the users dealt with priorities of activities and functions.

24/7

Ørestad Streethal is open 24/7 to the public, school classes and local sports clubs. It is divided into heated and unheated areas, with the unheated part as the biggest multifunctional spaces for different activities as basketball and floorball and the heated part as a space for dance, yoga, material arts or floor exercises for smaller groups.

Ørestad Streethal is unstaffed and all activities and events are arranged and held by the users themselves whether organized in groups or private initiatives.

Invitation to creativity

As opposed to the surrounding buildings, the lowest point of Ørestad Streethal is facing Ørestad Boulevard, and in this way meeting and welcoming the people in the neighborhood on ground level. Furthermore, the building stands out due to its green roof and wooden materials.

Ørestad Streethal is a kind of shelter for local sports and social events and in this way an invitation to creativity, activity and recreation. It is built as a light structure that welcomes openness and unpredictability in this otherwise fully planned urban area. It generates social interaction and livability in Ørestad City.

The relation to the surrounding park emphasizes the inclusive and accessible character of the building, that has no back, but a long unbroken strip of windows making the activities inside, visible from the park – and reversed.

Architect

NORD Architects A/S
Hejrevej 37, 2.
2400 Copenhagen NV
Denmark

Client

Municipality of Copenhagen
Grundejerforeningen Ørestad Syd

User

Ørestad Streethal 

Team

Masu Planning (Landscape)

Our Partner

Opening

2017

Address

Ørestad Streethal 
Ørestad Blvd. 53
2300 Copenhagen S
Denmark

Budget

€2,800,000

Author

NORD Architects A/S

Photography

Adam Mørk

Our Partner

USER SCENARIOS

THE ARCHITECTS

About NORD Architects

NORD Architects was established in 2003 by founding partners Johannes Molander Pedersen and Morten Rask Gregersen (both b. 1974). Mia Baarup Tofte joined the partnership in 2017. During the years we have employed a multidisciplinary staff of urban planners, architects, landscape architects, process consultants, art historians, academics within social and cultural studies along with our technical staff. We are often asked to lecture and have been taking part in conferences, exhibiti­ons and publications on several occasions.

In recent years, we have designed and innovated welfare related projects in the healthcare sector as well as educational buildings, daycare centers, sports facilities and urban spaces. NORD Architects has experienced a growing international interest in the company’s unique approach to developing projects – as regards to strategic innovation as well as design.

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PLANS

Videos

ABOUT US

More Sports Media

About us

More Sports Media is the agency behind “More Sports. More Architecture.”  We offer support in all aspects of public relations work

If you do not have time to look after your publications, press releases or documentation, please give us a try. We know the industry – we have many years of experience.

Text, layout, graphics: One-stop shopping with More Sports Media – from the initial idea to the finished publication. We write, edit or translate your texts, photograph your projects, edit your pictures and plans or build your new homepage.

And More Sports Media ensures that the world knows about it: whether it be print or online, professional journal, portal or newsletter – we have know-how, experience and contacts to new and old media.

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Es Puig d’en Valls

Let the sunshine in

Es Puig d'en Valls Sports Centre

OMCEA Arquitectura

Essence

The project of the Es Puig d’en Valls Sports Centre was conceived in two distinct phases. The first consisted of the covering of the two existing outdoor courts, the second was the design and realization of the enclosure of its perimeter.

During the realization of the first phase, MCEA Arquitectura received the brief for the design of the enclosure. The main design goal was to achieve an element of fusion between the interior and its broader setting, so as not to lose the essence of the outdoor space for the practice of sports, which had been used as such by teams from Es Puig d’en Valls for years.

Shades of colour

Indeed, it was during the implementation of the first phase of Es Puig d’en Valls Sports Centre that the architects discovered the intensity of the shades of colour that the sun projected onto the building from first light of dawn (due to the absence of obstacles to the east) until dusk. For this reason, the introduction of these fleeting tones of natural light into the newly defined space became a fundamental element of the project, giving continuity in time to the sporting essence of the existing space, which previously was completely open.

Six surfaces

To define the relationship of permanent change between the interior and exterior, MCEA Arquitectura worked with the building’s six surfaces: the ground, introducing a blue colour so evident in the Balearic landscape, the ceiling, of corrugated aluminium, with a reflective capacity providing a fusion of all elements in the development, and the four walls. The walls are materialized through the combination of blind panel walls and lattice walls of 24 cm, exposed white brick with sufficient permeability to allow for the compositional overlapping of two opposing facades and the introduction of the colours of the environment as part of the composition of each of these.

Facades

On the western facade, the lattice panels are aligned according to the horizontal line marked by the stream that runs alongside the building. The eastern facade breaks this linearity to allow for a reflection of the broken lines of the mountainous horizon beyond. The southern facade, which provides the main access, incorporates a lattice fabric in a continuous state of changing colours, and as such constitutes the most representative element of the whole plot. The material selected for the lattice (white open brick), as well as providing notable nuances of colour according to the sun’s position, these ranging from ochre at certain hours of the day to pure whites, allows for the inclusion of a 24cm thick wall which greatly inhibits the entry of water into the enclosure, even in adverse weather conditions.

A close relationship

As a result seeking a close relationship between interior and exterior, the building is able to take full advantage of the prevailing climatic conditions, in order to attain a system of ventilation and natural lighting, and which leads to a level of energy consumption close to zero.

PROJECT DATA

Architect

MCEA | Arquitectura
Avda. Teniente Montesinos, 8, Bajo. 30100
Murcia
Spanien

Client

City of Es Puig d’en Valls

Project team

Structure: QL Ingeniería
Surveying: María José González Vicente
Execution Management: José María López Llaquet
Building company: TECOPSA

Address

Es Puig D’en Valls.
Santa Eulària des Riu
Ibiza
Spain

Aerial view

Thank you, Google!

Opening

2017

Author

MCEA | Arquitectura

Photograph

David Frutos
Fotografía de Arquitectura

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Quzhou Sports Campus

Between Earth and Mars

Quzhou Sports Campus
MAD Architects

Construction breaks ground

Quzhou Sports Campus designed by MAD Architects has just broken ground in the historic city of Quzhou, in China’s eastern coastal province of Zhejiang.
Spanning almost 700,000 square meters, the first and second phase have a total construction area of approximately 340,000 square meters, and include a stadium (30,000 seats), gymnasium (10,000 seats), natatorium (2,000 seats), national sports complex, outdoor sports venue, science & technology museum, hotel accommodations, youth centre and retail programs.

Heritage and history

MAD’s design for Quzhou Sports Campus embeds the functions of the sports park within natural forms, creating an earth-art landscape in the center of the city – a poetic landscape that falls somewhere between that of Earth and Mars. The architects not only dream of creating an urban space about sports and ecology, but also turning it into a unique land art park for the world, establishing a relationship between the city’s heritage and history of Shanshui culture.

Quzhou

Quzhou is a city with thousands of years of history, containing deep traditional culture and philosophical ideas; complemented by beautiful scenery, with lush forestland covering more than 70% of the land.
It is the region’s profound historical culture and natural landscapes that are its most precious resources. With this in mind, MAD envisions a surreal, ethereal and tranquil artistic landscape in this modern city, like a mirage, that has the potential to become a place of spiritual belonging for the future of the city.

Moving, drifting, climbing

The perimeter of the Quzhou Sports Campus site is surrounded by a dense forest of high-standing trees that secludes the uninhabited land from the city. As one enters, the view suddenly opens up towards broad horizons and the bright sky, while simultaneously appearing as a martian landscape, mysterious and illusory.
The overall environment stretches in large expanses and undulates; and the terrain of the mountains exists in a way that is sometimes open, sometimes huddled, and sometimes overlapping. As people move through the park, they drift, climb, and traverse the terrain. In the middle of park, there is a lake that has also been conceived as a sunken garden. Here, one’s line of sight looks straight out across the stillness of the water, offering the experience of an untouchable spiritual atmosphere as it reflects the mountains and the sky.

Stadium

Resembling a crater, the stadium sits into the ground, forming a deep space. It is crowned by a translucent “halo” that gently hovers above the ground like a floating cloud. Its proximity to the earth makes it seem within reach – close but untouchable – inviting people to engage in a dialogue between the earth and the sky, and discover spiritual truth. The adjacent rolling “hills” on the northeast side form the gymnasium, natatorium, and training centre. Above are public spaces and natural scenery that attract people to look up and pause in a moment of contemplation.

Encourage people

The buildings in the park breakaway from that of traditional stadiums and athletic complexes that typically highlight structural power, transformed by a more intrinsic and subtle beauty.
The interiors and exteriors of the buildings are connected to nature, providing an openness towards the landscape for people from anywhere, so that they always feel like they are immersed in nature. Pathways between the mountains and the lake meander over and through the architecture. They encourage people to slowly walk around the park, run along the trails, or just enjoy a seat on the lawn to take in the scenery.

Human-scale

The “peaks” and “mountainsides” of several of the “hills” are designed with platforms or skylights that allow natural light to flood onto the interior, and provide natural ventilation through the buildings. The exteriors are covered in greenery, which while being energy-saving, are also human-scale and accessible. They invite people to climb the “mountain”, walk along the “mountain” trails, and form a closer physical and emotional connection with heaven and earth.

Spirit and mood

Quzhou Sports Campus abandons the traditional urban construction model of conventional large square landmarks. Drawing on land art and the natural landscape, it forms a unique urban space, one that is embedded in the spiritual understanding of the people, nature, and culture of the city. In the early stages of humankind entering modern civilization, the Olympics put forward the slogan: “faster, higher, stronger”. This coincides with our challenges of conquering nature in the rapid development of our modern cities over the past century. As we move forward, the future of urban development has the potential to change and open up in new directions – towards a future where we pursue the harmonious relationship between man and nature. Ma Yansong (MAD) said: “The relationship between man and nature is not only about ecology and sustainability, but it is also about spirit and mood. This is the culture and philosophy that has long existed in the history of this land and needs to be applied in the development of our future cities.”

PROJECT DATA

Architect

MAD Architects
8F, Tower A, NO. 107
North Dongsi Street, Dongcheng District
CN – Beijing 100007

Principal Partners in Charge:
MA Yansong, DANG Qun, Yosuke Hayano

Associate Partners in Charge:
LIU Huiying, Kin Li, FU Changrui

Design Team:
XU Chen, LI Guangchong, Iting Lien, LI Cunhao, LIU Hailun, LI Hui, MA Yin, Kyung Eun Na, Alessandro Fisalli, KANG Wenzhao, Thoufeeq Ahmed, ZHOU Haimeng, Neeraj Mahajan, ZHANG Yufei

Client

Quzhou West District Development Committee

Companies involved

Client: Quzhou West District Development Committee

Executive Architect:
CCDI Group
Landscape Architect:
PWP Landscape Architecture
Structural Engineer:
Schlaich Bergermann Partner
MEP Engineer:
SC Consultants Limited
Façade Consultant:
RFR Asia
Lighting Consultant:
Ning’s Field Lighting Design
Animation Support:
SAN

Author

MAD Architects

Opening

2021

ILLUSTRATIONS

About

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Streetmekka

Sports meets culture

Streetmekka in Viborg

EFFEKT

About

Streetmekka is a new cultural destination offering a wide variety of facilities for self-organized sports like parkour, skate, bouldering, basketball, trial as well as a series of customized workshop areas for music production, DJ’ing, an animation studio, fabrication lab and various artist studios and wood and metal workshops.

Social spaces and informal meeting areas are distributed throughout the building and strategically interwoven in-between primary functions based on the notion that proximity to activities lower the threshold for participation.

Abandoned

The original building once served as a windmill factory and is a typical example of one of the many mass-produced warehouse or factory buildings from the late 1960’s and 70’s found in almost every suburban industrial zone in the western world. Constructed from prefabricated concrete panels or corrugated steel, these industrial leftovers are perceived as having little or negligible historic, cultural and architectural value.

Instead of taking the traditional approach and demolishing the leftover building EFFEKT wanted to explore how to re-use and re-program this type of insig­nificant and mostly introverted building typology in a qualitative way and at a very limited budget?

‘However uninteresting and grey the exterior of these boxes appear, they often contain an impressive interior space of magnificent scale and almost cathedral-like proportions based on a repetitive, neatly arranged structural system. To us this vast space posed the only true value of the building – and we wanted to expose and highlight this to the outside world.’ says Tue Foged, Partner at EFFEKT.

Approach

The approach was simply to remove the walls at both ends of the building and to place all the administrative functions and workshop spaces on one side of the existing structure and the skate-areas on the other side, leaving the internal former manufacturing space intact. This clear re-organization also equips the building with a completely new envelope and exterior and allows the architects to pull in more daylight through the two new glass facades while improving the connectivity to the exterior spaces and activities.

With many vacated industrial sites being incorporated in urban expansion, this approach may be replicated and can pave the way for the revitalization of many other disregarded buildings left to deteriorate or facing demolition. New neighborhoods can benefit from these industrial heritage markers to build identity and sense of place.

Individualized alternatives

The functional goal of the new Streetmekka is to create a series of functional spaces for sports, cultural and social purposes arranged in a highly complex programmatic network. The aim is to meet the increasing demand for self-organized and individualized alternatives to the established club-sports and cultural activities, supporting GAME’s mission to attract local youth and create lasting social change through street-sports and culture, enabling integration and empowering them in their future lives.

Targeting a broad demographic audience from across a variety of cultural backgrounds, gender, age and interests, the architects’ goal was to create an open and welcoming building, lowering the threshold for involvement and engagement. This was achieved this by making a transparent building with a clear, well-defined organization intuitive to everyone. An anti-elitist, pop-culture take on a hybrid between a sports facility and a culture house, that is robust enough to stay open to the public 24 hours day without supervision and where the users are in charge and take initiative.

Evolve with the users

The new Streetmekka 2.0 is for everyone. It doesn’t matter if you want to participate, create, hang out or observe – there is a designated space for everything and everyone. The idea of expanding the original program to include so many different types of activity under the same roof is based on the notion that co-existence breeds new synergies and new social relations. Additionally, it exposes visitors to new types of activity they might never have realized existed, encouraging future engagement.

The maker labs and workshop areas enable the users to continuously develop and reconfigure the facility. Streetmekka Viborg is not static in terms of program nor in physical appearance. It will continue to evolve with the users – both short term (due to the animated facades and the street-art) as well as long term (when new programs are added, and old ones removed).

Indoor streetscape

The architectural concept is based upon the idea of an indoor streetscape. The project opens the introverted industrial building and transforms the impressive central factory space into a new kind of interior space: a covered streetscape open to the outside.  The streetscape concept is used to define and organize the various functions and place them in relation to specific requirements, such as spatial quality, daylight, materiality and temperature zones.

The new volume is then wrapped with a functional translucent polycarbonate skin, giving the appearance of a light and welcoming building while also serving as a giant canvas for the local visual artists to display and project their art but also clearly differentiates the building from the surrounding industrial facilities. Streetmekka in Viborg is the first lot to be transformed in the new neighborhood and will work as a catalyst for city life in the upcoming area.

The surrounding landscape becomes the natural extension of the indoor surface with various street-sports and cultural functions placed in a recreational string of greenery connecting the site to the downtown area through a future pedestrian and bicycle path.

One third

The preservation of the original structure and the reuse and upcycling of materials made it possible to carry out the refurbishment at a very low expense. Many of the original components were also repurposed as furniture elements for the parkour activities and hang-out spaces. The final costs of the building are approximately one third of a traditional sports hall.

PROJECT DATA

Architect

EFFEKT
BLÅGÅRDSGADE 8 2 SAL
DK-2200 KØBENHAVN

Team

Luke Jouppi, Lars Pedersen, Jonathan Linde, Copenhagen Bouldering, Nørlum
BOGL landscape
Rambøll
Thomas Andersen A/S

Opening

2018

Address

GAME Streetmekka Viborg
Nellikevej 2
DK – 8800 Viborg

Aerial view

Thank you, Google!

Photography

© EFFEKT / Rasmus Hjortshøj Illustrations: © EFFEKT

Author

Effekt

PHOTOGRAPHS

PLANS

VIDEOS

About

“More Sports. More Architecture.” offers architecture, buildings, products, ideas and trends for sports and leisure.
We’re behind this: More Sports Media, a PR agency specializing in architecture, sports and leisure. We offer you support in your public relations work and in all your publications: Copywriting, Designing, Publishing.
We know the industry. Give us a try.

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Subi Surf Park

What a wonderful world this would be

Subi Surf Park in Perth

History

The closure of the cities primary football stadium (Subiaco Oval) coupled with the closure of two major public markets presented the community of Subiaco with a significant set of economic, cultural and identity challenges – and was the start of Subi Surf Park. Subiaco had for the last 100 years been heavily associated with Football and Markets and their loss was compounding an ongoing decline created through the homogenisation of a once diverse urban village. Subiaco Oval (“Subi“) is located in Subiaco, a suburb of Perth, Western Australia. Formerly the highest capacity stadium in Western Australia and one of the main stadiums in Australia, seating 43,500 people, the ground was the home of Australian rules football in Western Australia, being the home ground for the West Coast Eagles and Fremantle Football Club. Both clubs moved to Perth Stadium, completed in late 2017 and officially opened on 21 January 2018.

Design

MJA studio began work on Subi Surf Park after receiving a letter inviting participation in a community survey from the local council in anticipation of the closure of the stadium. MJA’s response to the survey took the form of a schematic proposal based around the principles of: inclusivity, expanded public space and access, accessibility, recreation and recognition of heritage. MJA studio proposed the following sequence of events:

  • Subiaco Oval to be demolished, concrete to be crushed for re-use
  • Replace Oval with large waterbody
  • Surround waterbody with public open space
  • Elevate the public open space, creating a hill rising above the flat topography of Subiaco
  • Activate the Ground plane with a permanent marketplace, hospitality and Football Hall of fame
  • Insert 220 dual aspect apartments between the Ground plane and the new elevated public space
  • Create a new axial link between the two adjacent train stations and line this axis with terrace housing and additional public squares and event space
  • Open SubiSurf Park utilising WaveGarden technology in the large water body

Lagoon

Subi Surf Park will deliver the highest quality man made waves on the planet, and the most authentic surfing experience for new and existing surfers of all ages, experience and ability. Once the lagoon has been filled the water required per annum is equitable to what is currently used on the existing stadiums lawn. Boundary Hill is a 12,800m² extension to Kitchener Park, the 1:20 gradient allows for disabled access without handrails throughout. This new public park is designed for passive and active recreation space as well as a temporary event space and opportunity to survey the lagoon, CBD and landscape beyond. The built form of the park and apartments below follow the geometry of the former stadium but their taper ensures a reduction of overshadowing to the southern neighbours of 25%.

It’s all there

The apartments are designed to maximise the amenity of the end user ensuring solar access and cross ventilation wherever their location. Each apartment has a private and public balcony space flanking their apartment allowing them to choose their level of interaction with the rest of the development. MarketHall ensures a permanent home for a new 3,000m² public market which can be open all week and on weekends can expand onto a 6,500m² Market Square. The intention of the Market programme is to support micro-entrepreneurs and help diversify the Subiaco economy. The history of Australian Football on the site is recognised throughout the proposal with imbedded art installations, augmented reality and a home for the WA Football Hall of Fame. Subi Surf Park is a brilliant conceptual proposal that MJA studio pitched to the local government and stakeholders in 2015. Unfortunately, implementation is still uncertain.

Project data

Architect

MJA studio Suite 6 / 23 Railway Road Subiaco 6008 Western Australia

Address

Subiaco Rd Subiaco WA 6008 Australia

Aerial view

Thank you, Google!

Author

MJA studio

Plans

Dashte Noor fitness gym

Let’s get physical

Dashte Noor fitness gym

Dashte Noor fitness gym is one of the public buildings of Dashte noor residential, recreational complex in northern Iran. The client’s main demands were two separate halls, being coordinated with the other parts of the complex while being a unique mass. As a result the concept was, designing a building with a dynamic mass which is an integral and a part of the surrounding landscape.

The main sky line of this site is made of forest, green hills and a blue sky. Therefore, the mass of Dashte Noor fitness gym moves from the ground very softly and reaches the sky. Having a peak in the form somehow memorizes the liberation of the spirit, energy and also the connection between the earth and the sky.

Architect

Narges Nassiri

Team

Mohsen Ghomi, Mohammad reza Mosavi, Keyvan Amidpoor

Client

Dashte Noor

Author

Narges Nassiri

Photograph

Shahriyar Mazaheri

Address

Mazandaran
Iran
Ground plans

The idea of designing a full length window facing the sky was to frame a reflection of it and also having an orientation towards light. Designing a skin which moves on the mass and selecting wood as the main material of the facade makes the building closer to nature.

Dashte Noor fitness gym is located in a site with an area about 745m². The ground floor is about 235sqm which includes the lobby, a bodybuilding hall, bathrooms, changing rooms and a bar. The first floor is about 170 m² including another hall, bathrooms, changing rooms and another bar and a place to sit and rest.

 

The main concept of the interior design was to create a space which reflects and gives the feeling of the whole mass and the exterior form while doing exercise inside the gym. The construction of the building are the two walls which face east and west and are both huge trestles which move with the curve and pull the 9 meter cantilever in the entrance. The two arch walls in the entrance and under the cantilever help to associate the main idea of rising from the ground towards the sky.

European School of Strasbourg sports centre

Sports for the whole of Europe

European School of Strasbourg sports centre

Strasbourg

Strasbourg has had the status of European capital since 1948. It is the seat of the European Parliament and the European Court of Human Rights. The city’s authorities quite naturally decided to a propose an educational offer designed to meet the expectations of the European and international civil servants working in the city by creating a European school. The school’s educational model, based on a multicultural approach, wide use of different languages, and emphasis on both children’s autonomy and parents’ involvement, covers a full school curriculum, from nursery school right through to the European baccalaureate.

Robertsau

The European School of Strasbourg sports centre is located in the leafy neighbourhood of the Robertsau, near the European and international institutions. The school has nearly one thousand pupils and, to meet its requirements and those of local residents, the municipal authorities in Strasbourg decided to build an open sports centre. The programme called for the creation of a multi-sport hall and a multi-purpose hall capable of serving as a venue for events not involving sport.

Architect

Dominique Coulon & associés
13 rue de la Tour des Pêcheurs
67000 Strasbourg
France

Team

Dominique Coulon, Benjamin Rocchi
Thibaut Muller, Fanny Liénart, David Romero-Uzeda

Author

Dominique Coulon & associés

Client

Ville de Strasbourg

Construction costs

4.300.000 €

Opening

2017

Aerial view

Thank you, Google!

Address

9 rue Peter Schwarber
67000 Strasbourg
France

Photograph

Eugeni Pons, David Romero-Uzeda
Ground plans & Site plan

Building

Beyond the actual architectural and functional qualities of European School of Strasbourg sports centre, the building creates a balance and establishes a dialogue with the European school. It prolongs the logic of the fragments already used for the school building. The volumes of the two halls are dissociated and angled, which makes it possible to set the larger hall in an ideal position: perpendicular to the street, on the northern edge of the site, its position minimises the building’s impact on the site. The full depth of the site is used; the shorter side of the building gives onto the street, making it more porous in relation to the landscape.

Entrance

The entrance hall is transparent, allowing sight from the forecourt through to the wood at the back of the site. The elements of the programme form a crown, with changing rooms and other premises surrounding the two halls and providing views both to the outside and among themselves.

Photographs

Materials

European School of Strasbourg sports centre makes careful use of rough, durable materials: architectonic concrete, galvanised steel, glass and linoleum. The multi-sports hall plays on the grey shades of these materials.

Light

European School of Strasbourg sports centre is orientated north/south, which is the best way to control natural light, while large expanses of polycarbonate provide and disperse gentle, even light throughout the hall, with no risk of dazzling or inconveniencing users. Particular attention has also been paid to the acoustic: up to a person’s height, the walls are faced with perforated coloured MDF panels, and the entire ceiling has been treated. Duckboard panels in galvanised steel placed between the beams create a meshed false ceiling: the technical elements are protected, while the lamps are able to illuminate the hall.

The warmth of the oak

The square multi-purpose hall is designed to contrast with the rest of the building. The varnished oak parquet floor laid in a checkerboard pattern curves upwards at the wall, and the upper part of the walls are flocked with acoustic plaster. The coffered ceiling repeats the checkerboard design of the floor. The entire double height of the hall is coloured dark green, enhancing the warmth of the oak.

Variations in grey

Depending on the light, the variations in grey featured in the project range from milky and rough to transparent and reflecting: perception evolves as the day draws on, setting up a valuable dialogue with nature. The presence of plants and the resulting quality of the light lend a precious elegance to the spaces.

Bayreuth Youth Hostel

Not just a clean bed and shower!

Bayreuth Youth Hostel

Holistic sustainability

It’s the new generation of youth hostels – innovative, integrative and international – and has recently opened: Bayreuth Youth Hostel, Germany. The fluid structure is integrated into the landscape, with contemporary materials and holistic sustainability – a place for active people of all abilities.

LAVA’s concept for the sports hostel is:

  1. Innovative – inventive new spatial configuration of the whole facility, including individual room modules, material use and design
  2. Integrated – inclusive ‘barrier-free’ building, with sporting areas merging directly with the building, and accessible spaces, facilities and grounds
  3. International – the design from creates a feeling of place and combines it with contemporary elements Bayreuth’s global partner cities

Generation Y

LAVA chose a ‘Y’ shape for the 180-bed hostel because it cleverly generates a connective central space and interweaves the interior and exterior spaces, offering expansive views and multiple accessible openings to the sports fields and gardens.

Gen Y travellers want funky design, a special identity, access to community and unique experiences. Not just a clean bed and shower!

So LAVA‘S reinterpretation of a youth hostel features innovative spatial configurations that encourage interaction and accessibility; sustainability at functional, constructional and social levels; and integrated sporting facilities.

The rooms, grounds and facilities  of Bayreuth Youth Hostel are all fully accessible and especially equipped for active people of all abilities. A whole wheelchair basketball team can stay here. Fourteen rooms on the ground floor are wheelchair accessible by lift or ramps, and there are walk-in showers, wheelchair-accessible sinks, more space and technical aids. Doors, terraces, sports and parking areas are accessible and there are customised way-finding systems with strong graphics. Inclusion is also seen in the staffing with about one third of Bayreuth Youth Hostel employees having disabilities.

Architect

LAVA Berlin
Saarbrücker Strasse 24 – Haus D
10405 Berlin
Germany

Client

Deutsches Jugendherbergswerk
Landesverband Bayern e.V.
Mauerkircherstr. 5
81679 München
Germany

Team

Tobias Wallisser, Alexander Rieck, Chris Bosse Julian Fahrenkamp (Projektleitung), Angelika Hermann, Jan Kozerski, Mikolay Scibisz, Nicola Schunter, Paula Gonzalez, Güley Alagöz, Elise Elsacker, Myung Lee, Yuan Ma, Sebastian Schott, Stephan Albrecht, Stefanie Pesel
mit Wenzel+Wenzel, Frankfurt Matias Wenzel, Sven Becker, Thilo von Wintzingerode, Erik Muth

Aerial view

Thank you, Google!

Address

Universitätsstraße 28
95447 Bayreuth
Germany

Author

LAVA

Photograph

Häfeler/Fotostudio Huber
DJH/Robert Pupeter

Opening

2017

Construction costs

€10,500,000
Ground plans

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Typology

The guest room typology is new. LAVA designed an intelligent wall system with modular contemporary custom built-in furniture – toilets, showers as well as bed niches. These three-dimensional wall modules facilitate different room configurations through partially rotatable beds creating two, four and six-bed rooms. They maximise room usage for a broad range of guests – from individuals to families to wheelchair teams.

The multipurpose central atrium is a surprising element with its play of materials and colours. It fulfills the youth hostel motto ‘Experience the Community’ serving as a hub for (digital) entertainment, interaction and communication. The amphitheatre in the middle is lit by a skylight above and connects to the different levels in a playful way, whilst giving horizontal and diagonal sightlines guiding visitors through the building.

Reception, seminar rooms, bistro, kitchen, sports and game facilities are spread out over two floors and connected to each other via this central atrium. Each wing of the Y has access to the exterior at its end, and many ‘loops’ combining inside and outside come together at the central point of the Y.

Parts of Bayreuth Youth Hostel double as grandstands for cultural events and encourage community interaction. Terraces allow direct access to the green fields and sports areas of the ground floor zone, all accessible.

Wood looks like wood

Another feature is no fake surfaces, just authentic materials – wood looks like wood. Much of the structure, including wooden trusses, is exposed, giving a ‘raw’ space. The wood, concrete floors and ceilings create an industrial robustness with brightly coloured infills and strong graphics referencing sports activities or natural elements like tree canopies. Using local materials and techniques there is a focus on solidity and functionality rather than relying on the latest technology.

Holistic sustainability includes environmental – local materials, highly insulated facades, renewable energy, pollution reduction etc. But it also includes social and structural sustainability. Universal design allows everyone to work and to stay and integration sees more potential users, resulting in optimum use of the facility. There are different utilisation cycles for various parts (construction, façade, technical development) – for example only along the corridors and the facades are there load-bearing components – room wings are freely dividable inside. So future reuse/change of use is possible – one day Bayreuth Youth Hostel could become a kindergarten, a school or a retirement home.

Photographs

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