Saint-Paul-lès-Dax

Saint-Paul-lès-Dax

Architecture and landscape

Plaine des Sports in Saint-Paul-lès-Dax
OLGGA Architects & Atelier CAMBIUM

Area

Plaine des Sports is located north of Saint-Paul-lès-Dax, a commune in the Landes department in Nouvelle-Aquitaine in southwestern France. The area alongside the 824 Departmental road is known as „Les Pins de Gouaillard et la Liberté“.

The main access is from Avenue des Lacs via the Chemin du Golf. A country road, that crosses the site, gives access to pedestrians and cyclists, notably from Lac de Christus.

Architecture and landscape

The sports complex in Saint-Paul-lès-Dax includes 4 rugby and football fields, a 500-seat stand, changing rooms, a clubhouse, a children’s playground, a multi-activity area with an athletics track, and a freely accessible sports/nature area.

The Plaine des Sports project is just as much about architecture as it is about landscape. Olgga Architectes sought to propose an orthogonal composition, a clean rectangle that encloses the sports facilities, framed by the playing fields service roads.

Ecological constraints

Many ecological constraints throughout the entire site had impact on the design by OLGGA Architects and Atelier CAMBIUM, e.g. the presence of protected species such as the false ringlet butterfly coenonympha oedippus and the European Nightjar caprimulgus europaeus and the proximity of wetlands and the Gouaillard stream.

Signal

The stand acts as an architectural signal, a line in the landscape visible in both directions from the 824 Departmental Road. Perpendicular to the road, its location makes it visible in a „green tracking“, a careful balance between planting and the presence of technical equipment such as lighting masts or ball nets.

The stand emerges subtly from the ground, embedded into the site topography. The two levels of facilities absorb the natural slope of the site. This layout meets the functional requirements with facilities open to the public on the ground floor and spaces dedicated to sportsmen in continuity with the main playing field. The entrance sequence, from the forecourt through the filter barriers in timber stakes on towards the stand ambulatories, gives spectators a panoramic view over the Plaine des Sports in Saint-Paul-lès-Dax.

Terraces and environment

Consistent with the design intent, planned as „sports terraces“ for Saint-Paul-lès-Dax, the playing fields are linked in successive degressive steps along a west-east axis. The site slopes down 7m from its north-west highpoint.

Outbuildings dedicated to plant and changing rooms create a second architectural focus in the landscape. Wedged between playing fields #2 and #3, this simple building is covered with timber sheets that project beyond its gables. These facades act as a reference point within site.

In addition to a Plaine des Sports, the proposal provides a park for open air activities, inhabited by regional species due to the attention given to the surrounding environment.

PROJECT DATA

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Architect

OLGGA ARCHITECTES Paris Siège social 95 rue Montmartre F – 75002 Paris   Atelier CAMBIUM 144 avenue de l’Europe F – 33560 sainte-Eulalie

Client

City of Saint-Paul-lès-Dax
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Team

ITH, Calixte Tinard, A+R Salles, Sedes, Bilto Ortega

Address

Chemin du Golf F – 40990 Saint-Paul-lès-Dax

Aerial view

Thank you, Google!
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Author

OLGGA ARCHITECTES Atelier CAMBIUM
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Photography

Stephane Aboudaram | WE ARE CONTENTS
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Opening

2017
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Budget

€ 7,057,481

PHOTOGRAPHS

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PLANS

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VIDEOS

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La Doce

La Doce

Something bigger

La Doce in Mexico City

Football

La Doce is a collaborative project, based on a network and a proposal for change that arises from the need to develop quality public spaces in marginalized areas in various cities around the world.

Football as a sport is one of the most loved, most played and probably the one with the most followers worldwide. It allows us to connect with ourselves and with others and at the same time, and from time to time disconnect us from our environment.

Participation

Participation – and this is what La Doce is about – allows us to observe and coexist and be conscious that beyond football, there also is a social construction. La Doce is a space for a „hobby“ that allows to link through the game, an event that does not separate social classes. It grants the chance to be integrated as a team to those who are part of the moment – being part of something bigger.

love.fútbol

This manifesto is the basis of a proposal for a collaborative project: La Doce, starting from the mission and vision of love.fútbol, a non-profit that mobilizes and engages communities to plan, build, manage, activate and redefine their own football pitches as sustainable platforms for social change. Through the management and sponsorship of various entities, love.fútbol promotes and realizes the restoration and recovery of disused sports fields in marginalized urban areas worldwide, building quality public spaces.

Project data

Architect

All Arquitectura 

Team: Josemaria Quintanilla, Rodrigo Guardado, Salvador Guardado, Alejandro Guardado, Eduardo Ugalde & Judith Valerio

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Photograph

Aerial photographs: © Zaickz Moz
Site photographs: © Marcos Betanzos 

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Author

All Arquitectura 

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Opening

2018

Collaboration

Based on this idea, the collaboration between love.fútbol and All Arquitectura arised; one as the promoter, the other as the designer. On this occasion and with the sponsorship of Premier League team Manchester City, the project started. As part of the process, the integration of local partners was fundamental for the work of love.fútbol, therefore Natlik as the civil association was included as local interlocutor in the community.

Location

The project is located in the municipality of Valle de Chalco, refurbishing a living space located in one of the areas expanding dramatically in population and suffering from one of the highest rates of violence at the outskirts of Mexico City. Valle de Chalco is the destination of many indigenous groups from all regions of the country, a dormitory city that reveals one of the most complex problems of contemporary cities. An interwoven mesh of roots that represents a challenge towards the construction of social identity and the relationship with the space of the community itself.

La Doce is a collaboration, a coordinated effort and an alliance of designers, architects, artists, civil organizations, and neighbors, who in a congregation of proposals and social work are translated into a project that summarizes and tries to achieve the integration of a fractured collective.

Project

La Doce is conceived as two independent spaces that, beyond being isolated experiences, are linked through the activities they offer. A mix use court of 15m x 25m as a compositional axis, an essential part of the project that proposes relocation according to the North-South axis, allowing greater use of it throughout the day. Hosted between the streets Sur 11 and Sur 12, the property to intervene offers the opportunity to achieve the connection between both roads, allowing the user to make use of the same space as a link, following the paths of people through space and areas surrounding.

A large public square

An open pavilion ends in an edge of the playing field. Under a large roof several functions are integrated: the administrative area, a warehouse, restrooms, box area. Another adjacent area allows multifunctional uses including workshops, classes and exhibitions that may be carried out at any time and any weather condition. The pavilion invites the adjoining properties: an abandoned library and an uninhabited land, with the intention for a future phase to relate and integrate both properties to the project. A concrete platform, a vestige of the original field, is used as a large public square where the perspective and experiences of the many ethnic origins of which Valle de Chalco is structured can be offered through artistic presentations.

Images

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Videos

Elda Stadium

Elda Stadium

Bonus Track

Elda 3D Stadium

Boring

The design of an athletics facility is actually as boring as it is standardised and predictable as its subsequent use: curve, straight, curve, straight – as long as you want. Perfectly standardized sports architecture is as universal as little else: the track is thus 400 metres long, the bend radius is 36.5 metres and the lane width 1.22 metres. Same in Elda, a city with 55,000 inhabitants northwest of Alicante.

Elda stadium meets all these criteria, but adds a spectacular innovation to the range of sports facilities on offer: a “Bonus Track”. The Spanish architects of subarquitectura (Alicante) added six six extra lanes that branch off behind and above the stand at the beginning of the straight and rejoin the straight at the far end of the stand.

Great gesture

This grand design gesture is also functionally plausible: the additional lanes form a roof over the curved changing room area and form the rear demarcation of a small grandstand with a capacity of 300 spectators. In addition to the two changing rooms, the 350 m² area also includes office and storage rooms, a multipurpose room and spectator toilets. The consistent avoidance of elaborate materials and details – the façade design is reduced to a sheet steel grid with a band of windows – underlines the bold attitude of the planners.

Architect

Subarquitectura

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Team

Andrés Silanes, Fernando Valderrama, Carlos Bañón

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Client

City of Elda

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Address

Paseo de la Mora, 1D ES – 03600 Elda

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Aerial view

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Opening

2011

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Photograph

David Frutos Ruiz
Subarquitectura

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Author

Johannes Bühlbecker
More Sports Media

Site plans

Accessible for everyone

Facility access and use of Elda stadium are barrier-free. Visitors and athletes enter the changing rooms and the interior through the ground floor tunnel. Tracks and inclines are designed to be suitable for wheelchair users.

Great everyday life

Elda stadium raises the standardised athletics competition area to the third dimension. At the same time, viewers are moving into a new, central position. This solution may be hard to realize for large competitions with many spectators, but it is a great impulse for the much more frequent daily sporting activities.

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L53l-y6a3Jk

Images

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Tossols Basil

Tossols Basil

Trees on the pitch

Tossols Basil Athletics Stadium

Tossols Basil

The area called Tossols Basil, which is designated for leisure activities, is located at the edge of both a city and a natural park along a river. When contemplating adding sports facilities here, the architects faced a dilemma of either clearing large amounts of slow-growing oak trees or succumbing to environmentalists who wanted no change at all.

The solution was to site the athletic track in a forest clearing, previously used for cultivation. Nature and sports are united and runners appear and disappear as they make their way around the track. The project highlights the beauty of the landscape and preserves the vegetation as a filter that changes with the seasons.

The seating for observing the athletes is developed as small terraces or embankments between the clearings, often using the natural topography. The slender lighting towers become points of reference in the landscape.

Natural surroundings

Set in natural surroundings, this athletics track enables the merits of the existing landscape to be emphasized and the track events themselves to be brought closer to nature.
The track is implanted in two clearings in the white oak wood. Contiguous woodland at a distance and far-off woodland are the relations established between the track and the wood, the seating being developed as small terraces or as embankments between the clearings.
As well as containing the functional facilities, its equipment is interrelated with the walls, embankments and ramps that formalize the change in height from entrance to track; it is the great gateway directed towards the races, a filter between nature and the urban. A gateway that is an extended roof held up by two volumes, one of which is like a great open window with a glass wall which doesn’t interrupt the visual continuity and picks up the reflection of the wood that has determined the entire intervention.

Architect

RCR Arquitectes Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, Ramón Vilalta Marià Vayreda, 23 ES – 17800 Olot

Team

M.Tàpies, A.Sáez, M.Bordas, Brufau, Obiol, Moya. G.Rodriguez, P.Rifà

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Client

C. Bisbe Guillamet

Building contractor

C. Joan Maragall
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Address

Carrer Cadis, 35 17800 Olot Es – Girona, Spanien

Aerial view

Thank you, Google!

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Photograph

H.Suzuki, E.Pons, M.Checinski

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Author

RCR Arquitectos

Site plans

The beauty of steel

After completing the track in 2001, other facilities have been added; a soccer field and an entrance pavilion with changing facilities, that RCR calls the 2x1 pavilion. This structure that acts as a gateway to the area has a thin roof supported by two volumes allowing multiple views through.

Once again, RCR employs only one material – Cor-Ten steel – and the structure settles easily into its natural setting.

Running, nature and Pritzker

Set in natural surroundings, this athletics track enables the merits of the existing landscape to be emphasized and the track events themselves to be brought closer to nature.

The track is implanted in two clearings in the white oak wood. Contiguous woodland at a distance and far-off woodland are the relations established between the track and the wood, the seating being developed as small terraces or as embankments between the clearings.

As well as containing the functional facilities, its equipment is interrelated with the walls, embankments and ramps that formalize the change in height from entrance to track; it is the great gateway directed towards the races, a filter between nature and the urban. A gateway that is an extended roof held up by two volumes, one of which is like a great open window with a glass wall which doesn’t interrupt the visual continuity and picks up the reflection of the wood that has determined the entire intervention.

Sharon Fieldhouse

Sharon Fieldhouse

Learning by doing

Sharon Fieldhouse in Clifton Forge

Program Description

The design/buildLAB is a project-based experiential learning program focused on the research, development and implementation of innovative construction methods and architectural designs. Students collaborate with local communities and industry experts to conceive and realize built works of architecture that are both educational and charitable in nature. The aspirations of the program are simultaneously to reinforce the knowledge and skills necessary to the students‘ successful and meaningful practice of architecture and to support development efforts in distressed communities by enriching the quality of their built environment.

By framing the opportunity for architecture students to make a difference in the life of a community, the design/buildLAB shows students the positive impact Architecture can make and inspires them to high professional ethics.

Project Description

The Sharon Fieldhouse sits on a hillside defined by a series of terraced baseball fields. It marks the land as a linear incision that cuts across the site and serves as a primary axis of pedestrian circulation. The building is fissured into three elements to allow the site’s circulation to weave its way in and around the occupied spaces. The entrance to the Fieldhouse is an arrangement of massive concrete steps, serving as a playful procession and an informal gathering space. Spaces within the incision are delineated by vertical steel screens that fan-out and range in density to create varying levels of intimacy.  Monolithic pivot doors heighten awareness as one passes from the extreme openness of the site into the intimacy of the restrooms and concession kitchen. White laminated glass bathes the interior spaces with even natural light. Nested between the concession kitchen and the restrooms, a shade pavilion slips out of line, offering a cool repose overlooking the field. The openness of the screens allows breezes to pass through as well as views to the surrounding mountains. The pavilion space steps toward the field with a series of faceted grass seating terraces, inviting spectators to sit and enjoy the game. As the incision reaches the forest, at the edge of the site, it gently dissolves into a sunken rainwater filtration marsh. In the evening, points of white light emerge as a constellation on the oiled oak ceiling. In this rich natural landscape, transparent forms and subtle details imbue the architecture with a peaceful presence, a magical atmosphere for community gatherings.

Architect

design/buildLAB
VA Tech School of Architecture + Design
201 Cowgill Hall
US-Blacksburg, VA 24061
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Opening

2014

Team

Students:
Landon Williams, Molly Vaughan, Mitchell August, Ryan Myers, Julia Vasquez, Xiao Fu, Ellie Burns, Forrest Bibeau, Mykayla Fernandes, Kellen McGinley, John Iaconis, Chanel Carter-Harris, Barbara Dior, Nancy Redenius, Tom Powers

Professors:
Marie Zawistowski, Architecte DPLG, Keith Zawistowski, AIA, NCARB, GC

Client

Clifton Forge Little League
P.O. Box 77
Clifton Forge, VA 24422
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Construction costs

97.000 €

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Author

Marie Zawistowski + Keith Zawistowski

Photograph

© Jeff Goldberg/ESTO

Collaboration

The Sharon Fieldhouse­ is a charitable undertaking that was designed and built by 15 third year undergraduate Architecture students from Virginia Tech’s design/buildLAB. After studying the town and working with the community to develop a program, all 15 students made individual design propositions for the project. From those, students iteratively merged their proposals. In this way, all of the students contributed ideas to the discussion. It was imperative from a pedagogical perspective that not one “scheme” was chosen. Rather, all students collaborated to develop the final design for the project.

Social Consciousness

Clifton Forge, Virginia is representative of many previously prosperous American towns, struggling to survive as the industries, which fueled their growth, continue to abandon them. Tucked within a small valley along the Jackson River, this rural Appalachian rail town faces severe urban challenges. Deserted storefronts, empty houses and decaying infrastructure contribute to an underlying sense of abandonment. With a combined median household income of ,000 annually, Clifton Forge is in need of recreational and cultural facilities to expand opportunities for its own future.

The Sharon Fieldhouse­ was an all-volunteer design and construction undertaking for a non-profit little league. It was led by 15 undergraduate architecture students who organized themselves, a team of professional consultants and a team of community volunteers, all with the aspiration of engendering a renewed sense of place by introduce vibrant civic architecture.

From a student education perspective, the project strives to reinforce the knowledge and skills necessary to the successful and meaningful practice of Architecture by addressing issues of social consciousness, community leadership, collaboration, consensus building, and environmental sustainability.

From an economic development perspective, the project demonstrates the potentials of locally available resources. By partnering with fledgling local industries to fabricate relatively complex building components, steel shops have expanded into CNC production, truss manufacturers have realized that their existing production lines allow for mass-customization and sawmills have found new markets in Appalachian hardwood millwork.

From a community development perspective, the energy, creativity, and commitment demonstrated by the students replaces despair with valor and caused people to get involved in revitalizing their own community. Among the many benefits of this community-classroom is affirmation of design thinking in place making: the education of Architects about the value of the public and the education of the public about the value of Architecture.

Site plan

Environmental Stewardship

 

The Sharon Fieldhouse project takes the position that environmental stewardship is neither a commodity nor an aesthetic; rather, it is a value underlying all good architecture. This position holds that the environmental problems of our age are problems of disposability and over consumption, which will not be solved by consuming more products, regardless of how “green” those products may claim to be.

The Sharon Fieldhouse addresses environmental leadership through cultural and physically durability. The project grew out of a clearly identified long-term need for a youth recreation facility and is built primarily from locally sourced long service life materials and time tested detailing. Carbon steel and float glass are manufactured in regional mills and are 100% recyclable. White oak, among the densest and most resistant of the Appalachian hardwoods, is sustainably harvested and locally sawn. Low consumption plumbing fixtures, LED lighting and smart fans limit water and electricity usage. A swale ensures that storm water returns slowly to the water table. And finally, the angle and density of the sun-screen increases from east to west in order to invite the warming morning sun and to shelter from the hot afternoon sun.

Prefabrication

Prefabrication is central to the design/buildLAB’s educational approach, because it allows a single group of students to lead a project from conception to realization, and experience the entirety of the process of making architecture. The students prefabricated the large majority of the Fieldhouse’s building components at VA Tech, while local contractors conducted the site work. This allowed for phases of construction, which usually happen in sequence, to happen simultaneously. The efficiency of working in a controlled environment is essential in achieving the schedule of one academic year. The prefabricated building components were assembled on site with a crane. In total, the students prefabricated and assembled the structure in less than five months.

The project is constructed from 4 primary components, each in a distinct material: concrete plinth, carbon steel screens, wood roof panels and white laminated glass envelopes. Shop drawings for all members of each component were extracted from a computer model, facilitating precise and efficient off-site prefabrication.

All concrete formwork was prefabricated and transported to the site to pour the porch terraces, knee walls, stairs, and slabs. The structural steel bents and screens were pre-welded using a series of jigs and bolted into place on site, allowing the frame to be easily and efficiently assembled. Drop from major structural elements was used to fabricate furniture such as picnic tables and a kitchen island. The trapezoidal wood roof panels were shop-built, craned into place and bolted to the steel structure. The translucent glass envelope was panelized, nested, coded and factory cut to minimize waste and expedite on-site installation.

Couch

Couch

Couch with a view

The clubhouse of IJburg Tennis Club

Ijburg

The Couch is the new club house of IJburg Tennis Club in a new district to the east of Amsterdam. On its six artificial islands, 18,000 homes will be eventually be built for 45,000 residents. At present, the district holds just 16,000 of these inhabitants. There are many initiatives to attract people to the area, such as the beach at Blijburg aan Zee, and the newly formed IJburg Tennis Club itself. The tennis club, currently with 1,100 members, has 10 clay courts and a tennis school. The Couch is the centre of the club’s activities. The zoning for the area allowed space for a tennis club, but a building could not be built quick enough, and so the courts were made and a temporary facility installed.

Accessible icon

MVRDV’s design filled the gap with an iconically functional building. The Couch provides both a viewing platform and a club overlooking the water. The aim of the club is to be as accessible as possible, meaning that it is open to the public, free of charge, 365 days a year. Not a private club, but a meeting place for young and old, where you can grab a coffee and a healthy snack, or meet with friends, or even just check your emails. MVRDV’s challenge was to create a building that works as a central gathering for the area. A living room for IJburg, where the building becomes a part of the community like piece of street furniture.

Architect

MVRDV
Achterklooster  7
NL – 3011 RA Rotterdam 

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Team

Winy Maas, Jacob van Rijs, Nathalie de Vries
Renske van der Stoep, Pepijn Bakker, Arjen Ketting, Sanne van der Burgh, Cristina Gonzalo, Rosa Rogina

Studio Bouwhaven, Barendrecht

Client

TC IJburg
Amsterdam
Netherlands

Photograph

Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee

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Author

MVRDV

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Opening

2015

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Address

Tennisclub IJburg
Zandzeggestraat 1
NL-1087 SL Amsterdam

Aerial view

Thank you, Google!

Site plan + ground plan

The roof dips down

The club house is a long open volume with services on either side such as dressing rooms, a kitchen, storage and toilets. The main space is multifunctional, so it can be used for the club’s many events. The roof dips down towards the south side and is raised towards the north up to a height of seven metres, creating an informal grandstand for the club.  The wide glass front to the north side allows extensive natural lighting and provides a view out over the waters of the IJ-lake.

Inside the Couch

Inside the club house, the concrete construction is clad with FSC-certified wood, with the outside fully sealed with an EPDM polymer hotspray in the same colour and texture as the clay tennis courts. The reduced glass surface to the south helps to cool the building. The thermal mass characteristics of the materialisation in concrete and wood are used to reach a high degree of energy efficiency. The building is heated with district heating made efficient by a heat exchange system. In summer there will be natural ventilation, adding to the ambitious sustainability profile of the structure.

A clubhouse as a meeting place for an entire district: MVRDV make tennis a trend sport.

Images

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Stade du Merlan

Stade du Merlan

Learning from turtles

Stade du Merlan in Marseille

Noisy neighbours

The project of Stade du Merlan meets two fundamental questions: the wish of contracting authorities not to stigmatize a neighborhood, and the desire to design some architecture.

The current site was abandoned and was the scene of burned cars and all kind of smugglings. The constraints were announced, the specifications well defined:

– A disadvantaged neighborhood, plagued with delinquency
– The necessary management of unwanted intrusions
– A grid impossible to cross and resistant to attacks
– A building resisting to burglaries, graffitis, broken windows, squatting…
– All this respecting, of course, ease of maintenance and servicing.

Bunker vs turtle

The importance of architectural design seemed so essential and, to bunker-like architecture in such neighborhoods where sometimes famous mediated scenes take place, we have preferred a „turtle-like“ intervention for Stade du Merlan!

So the choice is simple, besides being adapted to the site: buildings will be buried in order to protect facades and roofs, to control access, and thus, provide a green space lacking in these concrete asphalt neighborhoods.

This unexpected functional response should not only intervene on the lives of people but also transform the aesthetics of Stade du Merlan: creating a „bubble of air“, a parenthesis, a kind of sacred place of sports and recreation, dedicated to schools and residents. The project borrows a vegetal vocabulary to offer a unique outdoor space!

Architects

ATELIER NAOM* (New Architectes Of’ Marseille) 467 avenue de mazargues 13008 Marseille Frankreich
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Client

STB Northeast 20 Bd Françoise Duparc 13 004 Marseille Frankreich
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Address

Avenue de l’escadrille Normandie-Niemen Marseille 13e Frankreich

Aerial view

Thank you, Google!
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Author

ATELIER NAOM*
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Photograph

ATELIER NAOM*

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Construction costs

€3,265,000
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Opening

2016

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Materials

The patina of corten steel, in warm shades ranging from orange to brown, evoking the color of the earth, joins the green slopes dotted with fallow lands and flowers.

The blades of the fence offering closed view from the front, evaporate quickly like twigs in side view, allowing to close the site while keeping a sensible and perceptible link with the nearby urban context. With the esthetics of this fence, we understand that it was not just to close, to delimit or to erect a barrier between Stade du Merlan and the rest of the world: building conception and architecture means above all creating links.

 

Sirens of mass distribution

As well, from a practical point of view, the selection of a material such as corten steel is a sustainable choice because it is stable over time, naturally durable and easy to maintain: after sanding (e,g, of a graffiti), the patina regenerates itself.

The entire street furniture was created for Stade du Merlan and, from the grid of tree to the interior signage, every detail is an opportunity to express our role as designer and to resist in our own way, to the sirens of mass distribution and its standard catalogs.

Photographs

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Barrancabermeja

Barrancabermeja

Architecture is action

 A roof for Barrancabermeja´s Parks

Barrancabermeja

In Barrancabermeja, a municipality on the banks of the river Magdalena, in Colombia’s department of Santander, stands this open pavilion containing recreational and sports facilities. The 7,000-square-meter public center is protected by a modular structure raised on slender columns, facilitating future enlargements. The system of elongated rhombi has openings to filter in sunlight and incorporate ventilators, sprinklers, and sound and lighting devices.

Prototype

This projects aim is to create an open space that gives true relevance to the role of the community in the construction of a city. A modular system is composed from an elongated rhombus type piece that multiplies and unites in a base module or a complementary module, making an adaptable and progressively growing and transforming structure. A vast generative ceiling emerges from a series of connected and raised pieces that allow existing and unique realities of its location to infiltrate within its interiors. A sequence of physical perceptions based on natural factors such as humidity, heat, cold or luminosity accompanied by controlled elements like light filtration, fans and aspersers, or sound and water implementations, create a spontaneous atmosphere that make people sensible to their own bodies relationship with nature.

Architect

El Equipo Mazzanti
Calle 69 No. 10 – 06
Bogotá
Colombia

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Team

Giancarlo Mazzanti, Carlos Medellín, Humberto Mora, Simón Escabi, Juan Carlos Zapata, Luz Rocío Lamprea, Juan Carlos Zapata, Laura Pachón, Lorena Mendoza, Manuela Dangond, Andrés Melo,  Juan Esteban Parra, Julian Quiroz, Pablo Maal

Structural engineer
Nicolás Parra

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Client

Municipio de Barrancabermeja

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Author

El Equipo Mazzanti

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Photograph

Alejandro Arango – Pequeño Robot
Dirección de fotografía: Mariana Bravo

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Opening

2016

Video
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Structure

The structure acts as a tool for promoting any sort of activities ranging from sportive, ludic, economic, academic and cultural, to social, taking advantage of its open kind that suggests interactions between people and with nature. The design is defined by the trees’ and bushes’ shape, which determine if the structure bends, expands or wraps around them.

El Equipo Mazzanti

The architects El Equipo Mazzanti state: “Architecture is action. We induce actions, happening and relationships, which allows us to develop forms, pattern and open material organizations that act in the social operations construction. With this we don´t refer to the application of functional authoritarian diagrams but the action that trigger new day to day interactions that are able to trigger behaviors and new dynamics, encouraging people to act in ways they´ll never think to act.”

Rwanda Cricket Stadium

Rwanda Cricket Stadium

Celebrating imperfection

Rwanda Cricket Stadium

History

Cricket was barely played in Rwanda before the 1994 genocide. Now there are 7,000 players nationwide, and the sport is playing a lead role in the healing process. The inauguration of Rwanda Cricket Stadium marks the end of a remarkable six-year undertaking by the Rwanda Cricket Stadium Foundation who have raised the £1 million required to build the spectacular new home of Rwandan cricket. Previously Rwanda’s only other cricket pitch was at at Ecole Technique Officielle, the site of a notorious 1994 massacre and the location of the film Shooting Dogs.

The Rwanda Cricket Stadium is designed for long-term sustainability. The entire site is being constructed to ensure significant carbon savings and sustainable water usage, it will incorporate environmentally sensitive design, provide jobs for the local community, and ensure a revenue stream that will allow for the upkeep of the facility and further investment in the game. The construction process used predominantly local labour, investing in the local community.

The new pavilion, which will also serve as an HIV testing centre and restaurant in the future is a fantastic feat of engineering, built using 66,000 handmade tiles in layers without using concrete. The arched pavilion design represents the fall of a bouncing ball and spectator seating will be carved out of the earth to mimic the terraced farms on the steep Kigali Hills that provide a spectacular backdrop.

Architect

Light Earth Designs
Pioneer House
Chivers Way
Histon
Cambridge
Cambridgeshire
UK-CB24 9NL
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Team

Tim Hall, Michael Ramage, Ana Gatóo, Ben Veyrac, Wesam Al Asali, Anton Larsen, Marco Groenstege, Oliver Hudson, Killian Doherty

Client

Rwanda Cricket Stadium Foundation
PHOTOGRAPHS

NextGEN gallery is not installed/inactive!

Construction

Die Fliesen wurden vor Ort aus lokalen Materialien von angelernten Einheimischen hergestellt. Sie wurden mit einer kleinen Zugabe von Zement hydraulisch gepresst und mussten nicht gebrannt werden. Sie wurden schichtweise auf ein provisorisches Holzskelett gelegt und sind für Spannweiten von bis zu 16 Metern geeignet. Geogitter wurden hinzugefügt, um einen gewissen seismischen Schutz zu bieten. Die Schalen sind wasserdicht und wurden dann mit lokalem gebrochenem Granit (der überall im Land zu finden ist) überzogen.

In die Gewölbe werden einfache, effiziente und dünne Betontische eingesetzt, die Platz für die geschlossenen Funktionen der Servicebereiche bieten: Umkleideräume, Büros, Restaurant. Diese Tische sind mit natürlichen ruandischen Fliesen gestaltet. Die offenen Mezzanine – die Bar und das Clubhaus – bieten einen herrlichen Panoramablick über das Oval und in die wunderschöne Landschaft.

Mit Hilfe von Ziegelsteinen werden Grenzen und Zwischenräume definiert, die oft in perforierter Fugen verlegt werden, so dass Luft und Licht hindurch gelangen. Für den Bodenbelag werden die Abfälle des ruandischen Granitbodens und der Arbeitsplatten verwendet. Die Sperrholz-Rechtecke, aus denen die Fliesen gepresst werden, werden als Arbeitsplatten wiederverwendet, während Holz und Sperrholz aus der Gewölbeführung zu Türen verarbeitet werden, so dass ein Maximum an Abfallstoffen in die Primärproduktion gelangt. Die Stützmauern bestehen entweder aus lokalen Granitblöcken oder sind hohl, um die Bepflanzung zu ermöglichen.

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Author

Light Earth Designs
Johannes Bühlbecker
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Photograph

Light Earth Designs
Michael Ramage, Jonathan Gregson

Address

Unnamed Road
Ruanda

Aerial view

Thank you, Google!
SITE PLAN
SECTION
LEVEL 0
LEVEL1

Prospects

The building grows out of the cut soil banking that was formed as the pitch was levelled – thus becoming part of the landscape. The banking creates a wonderful natural amphitheatre with great views to the pitch and wetland valley beyond.

Whilst the language of the building speaks about progression and dynamism through extreme structural efficiency, the materials speak of the natural, the hand made and the human. It a building made by Rwandans using Rwandan materials.

The imperfections are celebrated – they are human and beautiful – and when combined with the layering of natural textures the building becomes imbues and celebrates this wonderful place.

A’Beckett Urban Square

A’Beckett Urban Square

Instant magnet

A’Beckett Urban Square in Melbourne

Pop-up

A’Beckett Urban Square is a temporary ‘pop-up’ recreational space that has become an instant magnet for students and young urban dwellers. Located behind the new Swanston Academic Building the site had been used by RMIT University for many years as an open air car park. RMIT has generously turned this underutilised and derelict space into a publically-accessible 2,800 square metre park incorporating multi-use sports courts with spectator seating, table tennis, BBQ facilities, bike parking, Wi-Fi, pop-up plants in tubs and places to sit and relax.

RMIT will develop this site in the near future; in the meantime the university has opened up the site as a temporary place for casual recreation and engagement. There is almost nowhere in the city to play casual sport so it is hardly surprising that the new facility has become so popular. A’Beckett Urban Square adds a new venue to connect the University with the city and its people.

Architect

Peter Elliott Architecture + Urban Design Level 11|180 Russell Street Melbourne AUS-Victoria 3000
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Team

Peter Elliott, Catherine Duggan, Sean van der Velden, Daniel Bennetts, Juliet Maxsted

Client

RMIT University, Melbourne
SITE PLAN

Approach

The design approach is purposefully lean, developing upon the idea of a temporary and demountable installation. Typically ‘pop-ups’ occupy leftover and underutilised spaces through the use of recycled materials and the clever adaption of everyday found objects. They are often gritty spaces that are curated rather than designed. A’Beckett Urban Square was conceived as a piece of urban theatre carved out of the surrounding city, which is framed by new residential towers, multi-level car parks and RMIT academic buildings.

There is a playful use of bold colours and graphics on the ground plane to distinguish the active hard zones from passive soft zones. Wrapping the site on two sides is a specially commissioned large-scale artwork by Melbourne artist Ash Keating, titled Natural System Response. Keating’s work provides an engaging and energetic backdrop to the space with abstract swaths of verdant greens, searing reds and fluorescent oranges covering walls several metres high. Keating created the murals to represent the idea of an urban forest and a desert landscape, using airless spray from pressurised, paint-filled fire extinguishers.

BEFORE
AFTER
ART

An active place for casual recreation

A’Beckett Urban Square has been made as a demountable installation from a recyclable kit-of-parts. It is an active place for casual recreation, mainly for ball sports like basketball and volleyball. It is a place to socialise, relax and watch people. It has lots of casual seating, spectator tiering and benches offering good surveillance. It is a place for informal learning with Wi-Fi access and spaces to gather.

The eastern edge connects across a pedestrianized Stewart Street to the SAB building retail frontage and the main campus beyond. Landscape is limited to the established perimeter street trees and new plants in timber tubs scattered over a strip of artificial turf.

Go there any afternoon or evening and you will find crowds of young people shooting hoops or hanging around chatting or watching. A’Beckett Urban Square is a gritty fun place full of active energy and sociability. Its success shows how important urban recreation spaces are to the life of the city.

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Author

Peter Elliott Architecture + Urban Design
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Photograph

John Gollings,Ash Keating, Tony Owczarek

Address

22-46 A’Beckett St AUS-Melbourne VIC 3000

Aerial view

Thank you, Google!
PHOTOGRAPHS

NextGEN gallery is not installed/inactive!

Skatepark Bethlehem

Skatepark Bethlehem

 A place to make friends 

 Bethlehem Skate Park

Situation

Bethlehem Skate Park is located at SOS Children’s Village boarding school close to the historical place Shephard´s Field in eastern Bethlehem. To accommodate for the growing number of permanent residents as well as regular visiting school kids, the management wished to expand and enhance their site. The area to the villages east at that time was a worn-out playground that was unused and therefore designated to be repurposed. In collaboration with Skate-Aid and Betonlandschaften the layout was adjusted to fit a field for ball games, traditional playground elements like slides, swings, etc. as well as a skatepark of reasonable size.

The population of Bethlehem still suffers under high poverty and unemployment rates. Around 46% of the population is living under the governmental poverty level. Most of the young people who reside at SOS Children´s Village have lost their parents through warlike conflicts or terrors. They are in need of proper education which is mostly absent in the public sector. But not only education is missing: Children need a place to hang out and spend their free time, to work off their energy, meet up with friends and make new ones.

Designer

maier landschaftsarchitektur // Betonlandschaften
Rösrather Straße 769
D-51107 Cologne

Client

 SOS Children’s Village
Hermann-Gmeiner-Fonds Deutschland e.V.
Ridlerstraße 55
D-80339 Munich

Partner

skate-aid e.V.
Scheibenstraße 121
D-48153 Münster

SITE PLAN

ISRAEL & PALESTINE

BETHLEHEM

SOS CHILDREN`S VILLAGE

Bethlehem Skate Park

The design goal was to make the best use of the pre-existing terrain, trees and other features to create a natural, organic flow and not interrupt the landscape by forcing a shape onto it. A nice effect of this was that use of material and labour could be kept at a minimum, which resulted in low expenses for the NGO’s. All while the required standards for skateparks still could be matched resulting in a durable construction, which is up to par with modern parks around the world. The substructure is made up from load-bearing layers of gravel, topped with reinforced concrete that is smoothened in a special treatment. This way the rolling sounds and drag on the wheels are reduced resulting in a smooth ride without obstructions or excessive noise. Still the grey concrete surface prompts somewhat unsettling associations in a city divided by a wall from the same material. The whole park was therefore finally coloured in cheerful colours mostly with the help of the children living in the village. Alongside with volunteers from both Germany and Palestine who were involved in building Bethlehem Skate Park, supervised by a representative of Betonlandschaften.

Since the sports area is on the villages property and located behind most of its infrastructure including a gatekeeper’s house, it is easy to monitor people entering and leaving. Therefore, the spot is somewhat secluded which underlines the safe-space character and general idea of the park. The children do not have to be supervised and can play in peace while still benefitting from simple and effective protection against potentially harmful outsiders. A separate maintenance entrance with a lockable gate is on street level and makes for easy car and wheelchair accessibility.

Bethlehem Skate Park also challenges the established look of a skatepark. Obviously, the park is made of concrete, but who said that it has to be grey? The Idea of the park was to give it a new look and even achieve an optical illusion by projecting two colourful images on the surface and trace them with paint. That is why the lines look straight although the area is not flat. Once coloured, the process is never over. Children want to have change in their everyday life. This is why the design of the park can be changed by kids together with their teachers. It personalizes the whole area to be exactly how the users want to have it. The possibilities to improve art and design skills of the students are endless.

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Address

Derech S.O.S
Bethlehem

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Construction costs

€30,000

PHOTOGRAPHS

NextGEN gallery is not installed/inactive!

Goals

With only voluntary work and under the tight budget restrictions of humanitarian aid, it was still possible to create a unique, in-situ skatepark that is well within the recognised international standards while challenging pre-existing expectations on how a skatepark is supposed to look like at the same time.

Bethlehem Skate Park was developed to increase self-confidence and corporate feeling amongst the children through sports and exercises. The new skate park was built just inside the property of the school in order to keep it as close to the children as possible. In this safe place, the children can spend their time without being influenced by the political debate and by dangers happening in Bethlehem. They can discover the world of skateboarding and learn self-reliance!

While planning and constructing the skatepark one of the most important aspects was to involve its future users in this process. As a consequence, the kids could design the area for themselves and therein gain important experience in handicraft and craftsmanship. Additionally, it increased the positive attitude towards the project. Those actions broadened young people´s skills and possibly influenced their job prospects. Having constant access to sport activities such as skateboarding can not only improve the self-confidence of children, but also give them a platform to work on their skills and experience the progress of training. Skateboarding is a very personalized sport that brings young people together at the same time.

Traditional humanitarian aid projects mainly focus on one single matter that is often addressed without considering its surrounding social system, which results in not sustainable results. A skatepark on the other hand provides a strongly empowering platform for the youngest to build upon. It enables them to change their traditional mindset on their own terms and build a better future for themselves and their country instead of telling them what to do and how to do it.

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Author of text

Ralf Maier
Betonlandschaften

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Photographs

Ralf Maier, Harry Gerrard, Christopher Kintrup, Samantha Robinson

Videos Skate- Aid, Harry Gerrard

VIDEOS

 

Janwaar Castle

Janwaar Castle

No school, no skateboarding

Janwaar Castle in India

Starting at minimum standards

Janwaar Castle is located at the eastern buffer zone of Pana National Tiger Reserve in Madhya Pradesh, India. Janwaar is a small village close to Panna in the northern part of Madhya Pradesh – one of the biggest and poorest states in India. 1,000 people (300 children) live here, a mix of Adivasi and Yadav. Casteism and gender inequality are prevalent.

The people in Janwaar were relocated from the Panna National Tiger Park when the park was founded in 1981. The village has no history, it hasn’t grown up over time – the houses are widely spaced and meet minimum standards. Janwaar has electricity, not in every house though, and it comes with the usual cuts of 6-8 hours a day. Water and sanitation are a big issue. There are no health facilities, no shops, stores or businesses in Janwaar.

In the centre of this village, a group of professional and passionate skateboarders built a skating park: Ulrike Reinhardt in collaboration with Skate-Aid, Betonlandschaften and lots of unnamed volunteers. Today, Janwaar a unique place in India.

Designer

Betonlandschaften/ maierlandschaftsarchitektur
Dipl.-Ing. Ralf Maier
Rösrather Straße 769
D-51107 Cologne

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Team

skate-aid e.V.
Scheibenstraße 121
D-48153 Münster

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Client + operator

All levels welcome

The multifunctional skate facility can be used by professional skateboarders as well as beginners like kids, who have never skated before. There is enough flat surface so the basic moves like balancing on a board can easily be practiced. Even more experienced skaters can use this spot to work on their skills like flipping the board. The next step is to roll up and down sloped surfaces to get a feeling for the motion. The facility provides small skate elements like banks or wobbles, where this can be practised – enough to get the basic moves and enable further progress. Transitions are a classic element of skating, simply formed as a quarter of the pipe at different radii and heights. This element requires more experience to skate than banks but seems to be easy to ride for most Janwaar kids.

Further elements of the facility are curbs, ledges and rails which challenge the skills of even professional skateboarders. The whole skatepark can be seen as a training facility for all levels. Many Indian and even some international professionals come here and perform their tricks at Janwaar.

The placement of skate elements is a very important aspect since it determines the number of users and ways to use each element. Janwaar Castle is designed to be used by many students at the same time without running the risk of collision. This was made possible by placing the elements in a square form. Skaters can ride from one part of the park to another while still allowing for a lot of free space.

The substructure is made up from load-bearing layers of gravel, topped with reinforced concrete that is smoothened in a special treatment. This way the noise and drags are reduced resulting in a smooth ride without obstructions or excessive noise. With only voluntary work and under the tight budget restrictions of humanitarian aid, it was still possible to create a unique, in-situ skatepark that holds up with recognised international standards.

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Address

Panna Khajuraho Road
Janwar
Madhya Pradesh 488441
India

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Opening

2015
PHOTOGRAPHS

NextGEN gallery is not installed/inactive!

Girls first

Janwar Castle has two simple rules, „No school, no skateboarding“ and „Girls first“.

Kids are taught to skateboard and they learn it splendidly. More important, they learn to learn and collaborate. Kids teach other kids, encourage others, and build an atmosphere of learning and practice. “ No school, no skateboarding ” ensures that all children at the skatepark regularly attend school. This has resulted in an increase in attendance rates of the students along with a more enthusiastic and positive outlook overall.

Gender equality was taught to kids using an innovative method named “Girls first!”, where any girl gets a right to use a skateboard first. All she needs to do is ask.

 

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Author of text

Ralf Maier
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Photograph

 Vicky Roy

 

Sport overcomes all boundaries

 The biggest task, however, was to bring Yadavs and Adivasis, together. Big parts of India still face caste-based discrimination. Some important values, like respect and gender equality were brought to the children who are affected by the caste system. Since children in India are raised in an environment of great segregation, it often becomes very difficult to make friendships between kids from different castes. At the skatepark everyone is equal and able to communicate, play and share the fun with everyone, no matter where he or she is from.

Skateboarding helps the students to develop their social skills and lets them interact in an unconstrained environment. It helps them to communicate more and exchange their skating experiences. These abilities have a positive influence on their life since interacting provides contacts and improves communication skills.

Janwaar Castle provides a strongly empowering platform for the youngest to build upon. It enables them to change their traditional mindset and build a better future for themselves and their country instead of telling them what to do and how to do it.

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Construction costs

€20,000

VIDEOS
 
THE DESIGNER
Ralf Maier – Free landscape architect, CEO of Betonlandschaften/maierlandschaftsarchitektur
FIVE ANSWERS BY RALF MAIER
  1. Please tell us about your top 5 sports facilities.
    The Top 5 built by us are: Skatepark Betlehem (Palestine), Janwaar Castle (India), Skatepark Karoh (Afghanistan), Spiel- und Freizeitpark Gummersbach and Wheelpark Wiehl (both in Germany).
  2. Which architects and buildings have left a lasting impression on you?
    Buildings: Cologne Cathedral, Eiffel Tower, Karwendel Giant telescope and Holmenkollen ski jump. And architects who focus on people and nature and not on their own ego.
  3. What and whom do you consider as industry trends and trendsetters?
    Multi-functional sports and leisure facilities, accessible and open to anyone.
  4. What book should architects in this industry absolutely read?
    „Why do Architects wear black?“ by Cordula Rau
  5. What is/was your favorite song to listen to while designing?
    Chicane: Don`t give up

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