Sporthallenprovisorium Gloriarank

Sporthallenprovisorium Gloriarank

For the meantime

The end is inevitable — yet the Gloriarank temporary sports hall is an ambitious and forward-thinking interim solution.

The Couch by MVRDVPhoto: ©Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee

The tempo­rary sports hall Glori­a­rank will serve the Univer­sity of Zurich, ETH Zurich as well as the Canton School Rämi­bühl as a provi­sional faci­lity for the next ten years. For this tempo­rary cons­truc­tion project, the Basel team of Itten+Brechbühl AG (IB) colla­bo­rated with long-stan­ding partner Hector Egger Gesamt­dienst­leis­tung AG to develop a cons­truc­tion design based strictly on ready-to-use elements as well as other even­tual decon­s­truc­tion anti­ci­pa­ting measures. These reflect the aim of the new cons­truc­tion to be a contri­bu­tion to the Zurich univer­sity quarter taking into account various cycles.

The need for a tempo­rary sports hall is mainly due to the project Forum UZH sche­duled for reali­sa­tion over the next decade, which will make a signi­fi­cant contri­bu­tion to the large-scale trans­for­ma­tion of Zurich’s univer­sity quarter. The educa­tion and rese­arch centre in the Wässer­wies area desi­gned by the archi­tec­tural firm Herzog & de Meuron will offer space for 6,000 students. Reali­sa­tion of the major project requires removal of four exis­ting sports halls, later to be replaced by new sports areas in Forum UZH. The tempo­rary sports hall Glori­a­rank is intended to serve students of the Univer­sity of Zurich, the ETH Zurich and the Canton school Rämi­bühl as a substi­tute sports hall over the next ten years – in corre­spon­dence with the projected buil­ding period for Forum UZH.

Located within a steeply sloping wedge formed by a sharp bend of the Gloria­strasse, the new tempo­rary sports hall Glori­a­rank is in a neigh­bour­hood with some listed buil­dings. The tram circles the loca­tion in a gene­rous loop, making the buil­dings of ETH Zurich and the Univer­sity of Zurich visible from three sides – south, west and north. The grounds of the Univer­sity Hospital of Zurich commence on the lower side of the curve. A tempo­rary buil­ding housing the Insti­tute of Medical Micro­bio­logy of the Univer­sity of Zurich borders the peri­meter at Gloria­strasse 28, while a listed buil­ding by Bruno Giaco­metti – also part of the Insti­tute of Medical Micro­bio­logy – borders the peri­meter at Gloria­strasse 30. The historic trees around the Giaco­metti buil­ding are under garden heri­tage protec­tion.

The new timber cons­truc­tion is encom­passed by the Gloria­strasse on three sides, which is why a tripar­tite leit­motif was chosen. This is expressed in terms of volume, programme, buil­ding tech­no­logy and a propor­tio­nate facade. In addi­tion to a volu­metric response to diverse situa­tions in the imme­diate vici­nity, a central task of the archi­tects lies in embed­ding the buil­ding made of untreated larch wood in the urban envi­ron­ment harmo­niously. The clear and succinct design of volume and facade allows the tempo­rary sports hall Glori­a­rank to assert itself within the stony univer­sity quarter.

Carefully assem­bled from predo­mi­nantly untreated mate­rials, the consis­tent timber cons­truc­tion of the tempo­rary sports hall Glori­a­rank fulfils its role as a provi­sional sports hall cons­truc­tion. Sepa­ra­tion of systems (elements of diffe­rent life­span and purpose are sepa­rated as far as possible in plan­ning and realiza­tion), ecology, decon­s­truc­ta­bi­lity and econo­mical resource manage­ment are in the fore­ground. Sizes of prefab elements used in the cons­truc­tion are based on commer­ci­ally available mate­rial dimen­sions (avoid­ance of waste) and maxi­mised trans­por­ta­tion sizes (high degree of prefa­bri­ca­tion).

The OSB mate­rial of the prefab walls is left mostly untreated and visible. In contrast to this, doors are covered with – also untreated – HDF mate­rial. Panels of prefab elements fulfil­ling fire protec­tion requi­re­ments remain visible in the stair­well. Chip­boards are only covered with tiles in wet areas. Stairs and handrails are made of galva­nised steel and the main entrance door is composed of glazed wooden block frame doors.

The untreated, carefully composed mate­ria­lity conti­nues inside: walls and ceilings are – as far as possible – covered with wood-based boards – with the visible cons­truc­tion details domi­na­ting the design. Floors are covered with linoleum. A PVC cove­ring is used in the sani­tary faci­li­ties and showers, as this has ideal charac­te­ristics with regard to main­ten­ance and decon­s­truc­ta­bi­lity.

Photos

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Easy orien­ta­tion is achieved through vertical diffe­ren­tia­tion of usage, empha­sised by the archi­tects by using diffe­rent colours for the floor cove­ring of each storey: the ground floor features red linoleum, while the first floor is green and the second floor blue. Wall tiles in the wet areas also follow this colour scheme.

The front buil­ding accom­mo­dates chan­ging rooms, showers and WCs. These spaces are connected to the respec­tive halls via a central access space. A bit like a ruck­sack, the unheated volume contai­ning tech­nical instal­la­tions and storage areas is atta­ched to the front buil­ding and the hall volume.

While chan­ging and side rooms are cons­tructed using box girders, beech plywood is used for the large span widths required for the sports rooms on the first two floors. Glulam timber made of soft­wood spans the sports hall.

In line with the speci­fi­ca­tions, slope stabi­li­sa­tion in the north and west is desi­gned as part of the buil­ding. Circum­fe­ren­tial hori­zontal metal grating on the facade ensures venti­la­tion behind and under the cons­truc­tion. The foun­da­tions of the buil­ding are made with cast-in-place concrete that can be removed at the end of the usage period and reused.

To coun­teract vibra­tions, insu­la­tion and filling mate­rial is intro­duced loosely in wall and floor struc­tures, which can easily be removed and reused. Joint­less wear layers of floors can be removed during decon­s­truc­tion or repaired during opera­tion.

Elements such as flights of stairs, railings and doors can also be used again sepa­ra­tely or toge­ther in a tempo­rary sports hall in a diffe­rent place.

The prefa­bri­cated cons­truc­tion of the tempo­rary sports hall Glori­a­rank not only leads to maximum cost-effec­ti­ve­ness in cons­truc­tion and main­ten­ance, but also to fast and easy decon­s­truc­tion – and recon­s­truc­tion if required – of the buil­ding. The volu­metric allo­ca­tion of buil­ding parts, clear sepa­ra­tion of systems and open line routing also permit simple dismant­ling of buil­ding services equip­ment.

Project data

Architect

Itten+Brechbühl AG
Güter­strasse 133
Post­fach 3312
4002 Basel
Switz­er­land

Client

Zurich Univer­sity,
Baudi­rek­tion Kanton Zürich/ Hoch­bauamt

Opening

2023

Address

Sport­hal­len­pro­vi­so­rium Glori­a­rank
Univer­sität Zürich
Gloria­strasse 32
8006 Zürich
Schweiz

Photos

Yohan Zerdoun Photo­graphy

Text

Itten+Brechbühl AG

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Bergen ByArena

Bergen ByArena

Life in full swing

 

C.F. Møller Architects

C.F. Møller Architects are designing the Bergen ByArena with hotel and conference center — and the development of the Nygårdstangen urban area.

The Couch by MVRDVPhoto: ©Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee

Toge­ther with HLM Arki­tektur from Bergen, engi­nee­ring company DIFK from Oslo and Neill Woodger Acou­stic and Theatre Design from London, C.F. Møller Archi­tects won the inter­na­tional archi­tec­tural compe­ti­tion for Bergen ByArena. Bergen ByArena is a new multi-purpose arena for up to 12,000 spec­ta­tors, a large hotel and confe­rence centre and the deve­lo­p­ment plan for the Nygård­stangen area, where a new public trans­port terminal and 800 homes will be built.

The deve­loper is Nygård­stangen Utvi­k­ling by Thon Gruppen, Rexir and EGD Property. Their vision for Bergen ByArena is to contri­bute to making Bergen an inter­na­tional desti­na­tion for cultural and sporting events, while trans­forming the area from a run-down tempo­rary car park into a vibrant new urban and resi­den­tial area.

Bergen ByArena is located at Nygård­stangen, which today consists of paved logi­stics areas, a motorway bridge, a large tempo­rary car park and an inef­fi­cient bus station. The area curr­ently appears cold and unfri­endly, crea­ting barriers to the city’s use and connec­tions.  

From the start, the architect’s primary approach has been about how the flexible ByArena and the hotel can func­tion as a cultural beacon and become a gene­rator for urban deve­lo­p­ment. The design wants to remove today’s grey barriers and instead connect the city with a series of green connec­tions, nice streets and open spaces that work for ever­yday and festive use.

In addi­tion to the arena, the project consists of two super­blocks with 800 homes, large green cour­ty­ards, a modern multi-storey car park and a new public trans­port terminal for buses and light rail. In addi­tion, there are three new large public squares, a long park street and a wide avenue that connects to the city centre at the central station. 

Bergen ByArena itself is desi­gned as a super-flexible multi-arena that can accom­mo­date ever­y­thing from major sporting events, concerts and E‑games to confe­rences, exhi­bi­tions and much more. The arena is divided into three main elements, one with an open city base with a main foyer and outward-facing func­tions that contri­bute to city life, then a confe­rence and VIP floor that connects the arena and hotel — and Kronen, an iconic figure that hovers at the top of the city base and marks the multi-arena as a new land­mark in Bergen.

In the judge­ment of the multi-arena, the compe­ti­tion jury empha­sised that the arena’s base at street level creates a good and posi­tive rela­ti­onship with the city, crea­ting an important iden­tity for the area Nygård­stangen.

The project was won in two phases, with the first phase consis­ting of the compe­ti­tion for Bergen ByArena and Hotel, which led to the second phase inte­gra­ting a master­plan for the urban deve­lo­p­ment of Nygård­stangen with 800 homes and a new public trans­port terminal.

Work on the zoning plan and further sket­ching will start at the end of 2023.

Photos

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Project data

Architect

C.F. Møller Archi­tects
HLM Arki­tektur

Client

Nygård­stangen Utvi­k­ling AS

Images

Sora Images

Text

C.F. Møller Archi­tects

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Brighton Dome

Brighton Dome

Super Trouper

Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

ABBA started their world career in the Brighton Dome. After extensive refurbishment, more can now follow.

The Couch by MVRDVPhoto: ©Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee

Set in historic Regency gardens and adjoi­ning the famous Royal Pavi­lion, Brighton’s Grade 1 listed Corn Exch­ange and Grade 2 listed Studio Theatre have been refur­bished by Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios for a 21st century audi­ence.

The circa £38m project makes major tech­nical and opera­tional impro­ve­ments to the venues. The project unites restores and upgrades four exis­ting buil­dings: the Corn Exch­ange, Studio Theatre, 29 New Road and the Church Street entrance, while a new link buil­ding captures a former cour­tyard space, provi­ding a foyer and public and support faci­li­ties.

Essen­tial conser­va­tion work to the listed buil­dings peels back the layers to restore hidden spaces and reveal them to the public. The brand-new foyer, top lit bar and gallery space, and a restau­rant that opens out onto New Road improve the visitor expe­ri­ence and new toilets and circu­la­tion provide better faci­li­ties and acces­si­bi­lity for visi­tors, perfor­mers and artists.

Brighton Dome’s remo­delled buil­dings give it much-needed flexi­bi­lity in terms of layout, seating, infra­struc­ture and acces­si­bi­lity – allo­wing a wider range of artists and perfor­mers to come to Brighton. A new crea­tive space — called Anita’s Room — is also available for artists and commu­nity groups to use for work­shops, meetings and rehear­sals.

Brighton Dome’s Concert Hall and Corn Exch­ange were the first Regency buil­dings in Brighton, heral­ding a new era for the town. From riding stables for a Prince, to a place of protest for Suffra­gettes, to a tempo­rary hospital in World War I, to the stage that laun­ched ABBA to global fame, Brighton Dome has had many lives. It is now the South coast’s leading multi-arts venue, committed to driving a thri­ving crea­tive culture across the region.

The Corn Exch­ange was pionee­ring archi­tec­ture from the outset. A column free timber struc­ture, it measures 54m x 18m x 10m and can accom­mo­date 505 seated (max. capa­city) and 1291 stan­ding (max. capa­city) inclu­ding perfor­mers and staff.

Working with theatre experts and skilled craft­speople, the ceilings have been removed to reveal the original timber roof struc­ture, and the original character of the buil­ding restored. Windows along the west side have been opened up, and their original deco­ra­tive timber linings reve­aled and restored using specia­list craft skills and work­man­ship, conser­ving the character of the remar­kable 1806 inte­rior. 

 The better equipped Corn Exch­ange can now host a diverse range of uses, from dance and music perfor­mances to banque­ting, exhi­bi­tions, meetings, gradua­tion cere­mo­nies and cele­bra­tions. New inter­ven­tions include new sub-floor storage, suspended rigging, a new north-end balcony which conceals a 232 seat retrac­table blea­cher seating unit and an enti­rely new venti­la­tion system using heat-exch­ange tech­no­logy that opti­mises the re-use of energy within the venue.

Opening up the west side windows to the Corn Exch­ange intro­duces borrowed daylight through the new public foyer and gallery and also opens up views into the Corn Exch­ange from the gallery and Studio Theatre foyer, crea­ting a dialogue between the audi­ences of the diffe­rent spaces.

The Studio Theatre is housed in a Grade II listed 1930s, former supper room, that hosts 225 seats for more inti­mate perfor­mances, spoken word and rehear­sals. 

The theatre has been reno­vated and replanned to improve capa­city in a more flexible arran­ge­ment, with the addi­tion of side balco­nies. A new lift and escape stair enable the Theatre to have its own acces­sible foyer space with views through the windows of the Corn Exch­ange. New dres­sing rooms and tech­nical infra­struc­ture drama­ti­cally improve the usabi­lity of the faci­lity.

The ground floor of the Studio Theatre Buil­ding is occu­pied by a public restau­rant, opera­ting inde­pendently of the venues.

The new foyer and gallery connects the exis­ting buil­dings, adding key faci­li­ties for audi­ences and perfor­mers to unite the venues and improve the expe­ri­ence for all.

Corn Exchange

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Studio Theatre

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Project data

Architect

Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

Client

Brighton Dome & Brighton Festival Ltd and Brighton & Hove City Council

Opening

2023

Address

Brighton Dome
Church Street
Brighton
BN1 1UE
UK

Text

Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios

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Salle des fêtes de Pratgraussals

Salle des fêtes de Pratgraussals

Multifunctional

The “Salle des fêtes de Pratgraussals”: a multifunctional venue in France and part of the “Festival Pause Guitare Sud de France”.

For the community centre, ppa architectures + Encore Heureux have proposed a building that responds to the landscape, and whose morphology allows for a variety of possible uses.

The Couch by MVRDVPhoto: ©Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee

Site

On the north bank of the river Tarn, 400m as the crow flies from Albi’s cele­brated Cathe­dral of Saint Cecilia, Prat­graus­sals sits in a bend on the river on the site of a former quarry, latterly appre­ciated for leisure and nature.

Morphology

For the new commu­nity centre, ppa●architectures + Encore Heureux have proposed a buil­ding that responds to the land­scape, and whose morpho­logy allows for a variety of possible future uses.

The distant spire of Saint Cecilia’s Cathe­dral calls for a buil­ding of great simpli­city, laid out hori­zon­tally, its gallery rein­for­cing its pede­strian links.

Form

The sloping roofs indi­cate the centre, over the main events hall, and the two extre­mi­ties at the south and north corre­spond respec­tively to the main entrance and the artists’ entrance. The peri­pheral walkway becomes a suspended canopy, indi­ca­ting the entrance.

The simpli­city of the volumes and combi­na­tion of mate­rials offers a double scale: a dome­stic scale, with parti­cular refe­rence to agri­cul­tural buil­dings, and the scale of a public buil­ding open to all.

Architects

ppa • archi­tec­tures
Jean Manuel Puig, Laure Alberty, Ana Castro
9 bis rue Ernest Jean­bernat
F — 31000 Toulouse 

ENCORE HEUREUX
Nicola Delon, Margot Cordier , Olivier Caudal
104 rue d’Aubervilliers
F — 75019 Paris

Client

Mairie d’Albi

The Couch by MVRDVPhoto: ©Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee
The Couch by MVRDVPhoto: ©Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee
The Couch by MVRDVPhoto: ©Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee
The Couch by MVRDVPhoto: ©Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee

The centre of the project is the large events hall, whose roof makes it possible to adapt a reception area by decomposing it into three separate spaces.

Albi

The Prat­graus­sals commu­nity centre is a major amenity, part of the commu­nity, invi­ting, conceived to cater for the wide range of events that it needs to accom­mo­date.

The brief stipu­lates the cons­truc­tion of a large hall to seat 500, plus asso­ciated services: recep­tion, dres­sing rooms, tech­nical logi­stics, kitchens, manage­ment, as well as the neces­sary external deve­lo­p­ments in the meadow to the west, with its events stage.

Program

A hall desi­gned both as an important piece of equip­ment for the Pause Guitare festival, and a welco­ming and convi­vial buil­ding for multiple uses in the city of Albi. A simple brief for a commu­nity venue for parties, meetings, games and events for all ages and all passions.

Functionality

The centre of the project is the large events hall, whose roof makes it possible to adapt a recep­tion area by decom­po­sing it into three sepa­rate spaces, thus being able to accom­mo­date a range of confi­gu­ra­tions.

Parti­cular care was given to ensure both natural light during the daytime, as well as the possi­bi­lity to black out for shows or projec­tions.

Organisation

At either end of this space are, to the south the main entrance to the buil­ding, and to the north a secon­dary entrance, provi­ding the option of exten­ding the events’ space out into these two addi­tional volumes.

A broad canopy protects the southern entrance from the summer sun or provides shelter from the rain. On the north side, the canopy extends out away from the buil­ding, forming an external space like a little patio giving onto the park, which can be priva­tised. To the east, a func­tional concept provides access the entire buil­ding via an internal access passage.

Address

Salle des fêtes de Prat­graus­sals
113 rue de Lamothe
Ville d’Albi
F — 81000 Toulouse

Opening

2018

The Couch by MVRDVPhoto: ©Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee
The Couch by MVRDVPhoto: ©Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee
The Couch by MVRDVPhoto: ©Daria Scagliola & Stijn Brakkee

The building blends in perfectly and modestly with its surroundings — a real landmark for the municipality of Albi.

Materialials

This large space is covered by a zinc roof consis­ting of eight clearly defined pitches, contri­bu­ting to the iconic form of the buil­ding. The facades are clad in timber from the Limousin region. The bases of the walls are in prefa­bri­cated concrete studded with pebbles from the neigh­bou­ring Tarn river. The mate­rials are simple and natural, signs of basic comfort and real dura­bi­lity.

Images

Cyrus Cornut
Phil­ippe Ruault
Hugo Segura
Encore Heureux

Text

Johannes Bühl­be­cker
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Nemzeti Atlétikai Központ

Nemzeti Atlétikai Központ in Budapest

Post-Games Pergola

A spectacular feature of the Nemzeti Atlétikai Központ is that the roof will be completely preserved after the event – and will be converted into a covered public space.

The stadium is part of a huge plan to revitalise a former industrial site – with a park, a bridge and a training centre.

The Nemzeti Atlé­tikai Központ (National Athle­tics Centre) is a stadium which was opened in June 2023 in the Feren­cváros district in the south of the Hunga­rian capital Buda­pest. It was built on the occa­sion of the 2023 World Athle­tics Cham­pi­on­ship to hold 40,000 seats. After the World Cham­pi­on­ship, the faci­lity on the Danube will be reduced to 15,000 seats for reuse.

The plan­ning was carried out by Napur Archi­tect Kft Buda­pest, the roof by Buro Happold and schlaich berger­mann partner (sbp).

The stadium is part of a huge plan to revi­ta­lise a former indus­trial site (Vituki). In addi­tion to the stadium, this includes a park, a bridge and a new trai­ning centre, which can be reached via this new bridge.

A spec­ta­cular special feature is that the upper tier with its 25,000 seats will be comple­tely dismantled after the World Athle­tics Cham­pi­on­ship, but the roof will be comple­tely preserved — and converted into a covered public space.

Architect

Napur Archi­tect Archi­tec­tural Office Ltd.

Client

ÉKM

Athletics tracks & equipment

Mondo

On weekdays, a running track, a roller skating rink, a street workout park, a training area and a street food service will be available here.

So the legacy of this event is likely to be spec­ta­cular: the Nemzeti Atlé­tikai Központ forms the centre of the new park in the reno­vated indus­trial area, inclu­ding the surroun­ding Danube bank area.

 In addi­tion, Buda­pest will receive a new public sports and recrea­tion park.

The stadium was built in the middle of the park. On week­days, instead of the tempo­rary upper tier, a covered and illu­mi­nated running track, a roller skating rink, a street workout park, a trai­ning area and a street food service will be available here.

The roof consists of a support struc­ture based on the spoked-wheel prin­ciple, consis­ting of compres­sion and tension rings, on each of which two video screens and display boards were hung at the edge of the roof in the curves.

Under the stands there is another running track, which can be used for warming up. All the running tracks are from Mondo.

All the running tracks are from Mondo. MONDOTRACK WS™ is almost half made of natural rubber and non-toxic, recy­cled mate­rials. So it meets the stric­test certi­fi­ca­tion criteria for the emis­sion of vola­tile organic compounds.

In addi­tion to the 14,000 m² running track, the other athle­tics equip­ment also comes from Mondo – for the first time in Buda­pest, it is tail­ored to the visual appearance of the event.

Address

Nemzeti Atlé­tikai Központ
Buda­pest
Hajóál­lomás u. 1
1095 Hungary

Opening

2023

In the future, the roof construction will form a kind of urban pergola, while the interior with its sports areas will serve as a publicly accessible urban space on the banks of the Danube.

The roof cons­truc­tion will be preserved after the compe­ti­tions, as will the entire lighting, sound and score­board systems. This will make it possible to host major inter­na­tional events here in the future as well – with the help of mobile grand­stands.

These mobile grand­stands in the upper tier can accom­mo­date up to 25,000 seats, but smaller capa­ci­ties are also possible. In any case, these tempo­rary struc­tures will be dismantled again after future events, and the vacated area will be returned to grass­roots sports.

The roof cons­truc­tion will then form a kind of urban pergola, while the inte­rior with its sports areas will serve as a publicly acces­sible, urban space on the banks of the Danube and ther­e­fore in the heart of Buda­pest.

The 2023 World Athle­tics Cham­pi­on­ship from 19th to 27th August will be the biggest sports event ever held in Hungary.

After that, it will actually become even more exci­ting.

Photos

Text

Johannes Bühl­be­cker
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Pompidou gymnasium

Georges Pompidou gymnasium

Community centre

A place of multiple uses in a dense urban context — and in dialogue with the city. The sports hall as a community centre.

The Gymnase Georges Pompidou is a link between the city’s historical heritage and the ambitions of its future development.

The recon­s­truc­tion of the Pompidou gymna­sium is a key phase in the rege­ne­ra­tion of a rapidly chan­ging neigh­bor­hood in Cour­be­voie. Taking advan­tage of its remar­kable loca­tion at the corner of the two major axes of the City, the project assumes an essen­tial func­tion of urban repair between the hete­ro­ge­neous buil­ding heights, a link between the histo­rical heri­tage of the City and the ambi­tion of future faci­li­ties.

The general sobriety of the buil­ding volume contri­butes to its urban inte­gra­tion and gives it the forma­lity of a public buil­ding.

The project chall­enge was to inte­grate a large number of func­tions and spaces within a small site: sports acti­vi­ties (sports hall with stands, dojo, trai­ning room, dance studio, outdoor playing fields), cultural acti­vi­ties (music rooms dedi­cated to the muni­cipal harmonic orchestra) but also the relo­cated muni­cipal public gardens service.

The building mainly houses sports activities: a sports hall with bleachers, a dojo hall, a training room, a dance studio and also outdoor courts.

The coexis­tence of these three enti­ties responds to very diffe­rent opera­tional cons­traints, hence the exch­ange with the extreme and neces­sary compact­ness of the buil­ding.

The proposal is based on the rational super­po­si­tion of these func­tions on three readily acces­sible levels. These access routes adapt to diffe­rent publics while provi­ding views and trans­pa­ren­cies over the entire project areas.

Large windows on the ground floor give pedestrians a good view of the interior, while the glazed areas on the upper floor offer perspectives of the neighbourhood.

The buil­ding engages in an inti­mate dialogue with the City which projects inside and, at the same time, opens out to its surroun­dings: large windows on the ground floor provide the passer-by with an exten­sive view of the acti­vity within the rooms, the fully glazed upstairs recep­tion areas over­look the neigh­bor­hood.

The general buil­ding volume is composed of hori­zontal layers — alter­na­ting white concrete facing block and full-height glazed openings — which contri­bute to the unified project.

Project data

Architect

Enia Archi­tectes
46 rue de Lagny 93
F — 100 Montreuil

Client

Ville de Cour­be­voie

Physical address

Gymnase Georges Pompidou
11 Rue Fica­tier 9
F — 92400 Cour­be­voie

Opening

2018

Photograph

Jérôme Epail­lard & Teresa Machado

Author

Enia Archi­tectes

Plans

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La Minais sports hall

La Minais sports hall

Fits

A well-equipped key project for the development of the western French town of Sainte-Luce-sur-Loire.

The legible arrangement of functions gives the La Minais sports hall a clear stance.

Key project in the Minais district’s deve­lo­p­ment, the La Minais sports hall is written as a winding that unifies the entire programme in a gesture on the land­scape scale. La Minais sports hall is composed of three main elements: the multi-sports area, the bodily expres­sion room and the service areas.

Orga­nised in a stepped ring around the high volume of the multi-sports area, the ortho­gonal parti­tion deter­mines a use on each side and sectors easily prac­tices with or without public.

The tran­si­tion from the ground, grading the reading scales, mini­mises the verti­cality of the buil­ding and softens the rela­ti­onship with the envi­ron­ment.

The equipment is impressive: In addition to a climbing wall, there are two grandstands with a total of 500 seats.

The cons­truc­tion system is based on a ground floor level in concrete for walls and floors. The emer­ging volumes are made of metal frame with beams reaching 40m in the multi-sports area. A triple-skin façade with external insu­la­tion consti­tutes a uniform enve­lope.

The stan­ding seam clad­ding is composed of perfo­rated and opaques alumi­nium sheets laid in variable hori­zontal lines. In this unitary clad­ding, the main entrance and the terrace are imme­dia­tely reve­aled as major elements.

La Minais sports hall is written with quiet and bright tones created calm and serene atmo­spheres both inside and outside.

The insulated, three-shell façade gives the building a homogeneous appearance. And verve.

The clubs, sports asso­cia­tions and school groups are located on the ground floor, while the spec­ta­tors are installed on the first floor. A large stairway leads up the public to the stands and to the recep­tion area.

The recep­tion room, gene­rously glazed, is open both to the multi-sports area and toward the park through a long window extended by an acces­sible terrace.

Project data

Architect

Bohuon Bertic Archi­tectes
7 rue Louise Weiss
F — 44200 Nantes

Client

Ville de Sainte-Luce-Sur-Loire

Physical address

Halle spor­tive La Minais
0 Rue Olympe de Gouges
F — 44980 Sainte-Luce-sur-Loire

Opening

2021

Photograph

Juan Cardona

Author

Bohuon Bertic Archi­tectes

© 

Plans

© Juan Cardona

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Centro Deportivo Las Eras

Centro Deportivo Las Eras

Kissed awake

How a large but simple sports hall became a sports centre.

The Centro Deportivo Las Eras was transformed from a mono-functional facility of the 1980s into a more than versatile sports centre of our time.

The new exten­sion is directly linked to its natural envi­ron­ment. The old facade evolves gene­ra­ting a second faceted skin that protects and charac­te­rizes the project.

The result is a frag­mented volume that gene­rates a new public space with its move­ment and revamps the old sports center’s image.

A trian­gu­lated geometry which mirrors its inner pearl towards the outside: a clim­bing wall for the town resi­dents, intrin­si­cally linked to the moun­tains.

The new facilities scheme is organized among two elements: “The Box” and “The stairs”.

“The box” is s a free­stan­ding volume with an indus­trial character divided in two diffe­rent levels and finished with oriented strand boards.

The ground floor­plan includes chan­ging rooms and two multi­pur­pose rooms; a 90sqm one and a bigger one, around 130sqm and over 12 meters long with fencing faci­li­ties.

The first floor consists of a 100sqm spin­ning room and a GYM with over 300sqm. There is also a cafe­teria, directly linked to the new urban outdoor space.

The main stair­case serves as a connec­tion between the old pavi­lion and the new exten­sion.

It’s atta­ched to the solid concrete wall of the old fronton court.  Some openings have been placed stra­te­gi­cally to act as “inte­rior windows”, allo­wing for a direct visual connec­tion between the new and the old thus, uniting the whole volume.

Under these stairs there is a large storage area which turns into new tiers towards the inte­rior of the pavi­lion.

The climbing wall: a mountain symbol

Semi-buried and peeking towards the end of the corridor is the clim­bing wall. Desi­gned toge­ther with local clim­bers, it takes advan­tage of the old pavi­lion, using it as its main clim­bing support. The space loses height towards the boulder, thanks to a series of trian­gular tensioned trusses until it reaches its original human scale.

The project has been thought of taking into account its imme­diate urban surroun­dings too: its access and commu­ni­ca­tions. A new main access for the entire complex has been created, located in a slightly elevated square which is accessed through a comple­tely reno­vated prome­nade.

This square will work as a new meeting point for both athletes and citi­zens.

The main entrance becomes a bright, large double-height space, always lit up thanks to the main façade and the elon­gated skylight.

The mesh: a connecting element

The new program is protected and wrapped within a micro-perfo­rated skin that emerges from the exis­ting metal facade and evolves adap­ting itself to the geome­tries and inten­tions of the new project.

It’s a new shell that gives cohe­sion and unity to the entire complex. It acts both as a light filter towards the south and as a protec­tive shell, resistant to possible external impacts.

The chosen see-through mate­rial creates a trans­pa­rent volume where you can “see without being seen” from the inside; a living façade that dema­te­ria­lizes depen­ding on the time of the day.

Project data

Architect

Enkiro

Client

Hoyo de Manz­anares, Madrid

Physical address

Poli­de­por­tivo Muni­cipal Las Eras
C. de las Eras, s/n
28240 Hoyo de Manz­anares
ESP — Madrid

Opening

2021

Photograph

IMAGEN SUBLIMINAL
Miguel de Guzmán + Rocío Romero

Author

Enkiro

Plans

© IMAGEN SUBLIMINAL

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National Sports Centre in Magglingen

Indoor running track at the National Sports Centre in Magglingen

Run to you

The running track – spanning approximately 1,000 m² – can be dismantled into 230 portable elements, which can then be assembled and taken down again with ease.

The small village of Magglingen in the canton of Bern is, in practice, the training camp for Swiss top-class sport, including the National Sports Centre in Magglingen (NSM).

The National Sports Centre in Magg­lingen, a faci­lity of the Swiss Federal Office of Sport, offers trai­ning faci­li­ties for almost every sport, all under compe­ti­tion condi­tions at the very highest level. Among them is a mobile indoor running track that can be set up and taken down as needed. This has now been renewed.

CONIPUR SW was chosen for the floo­ring because, on the one hand, it meets the requi­re­ments of the World Athle­tics and Swiss Athle­tics, and on the other hand it is very light.

The Swiss Federal Insti­tute of Sport in Magg­lingen (EHSM) is the only Swiss higher educa­tion faci­lity exclu­si­vely dedi­cated to teaching, rese­arch, deve­lo­p­ment and services within the disci­pline of sport. It is part of the Swiss Federal Office of Sport (BASPO), which is also based in Magg­lingen.

The small village in the canton of Bern is, in prac­tice, the trai­ning camp for Swiss top-class sport. In this capa­city, it boasts in excess of 80,000 over­night stays annu­ally. For its nume­rous guests, the univer­sity runs the National Sports Centre in Magg­lingen (NSM).

Running tracks

Conica AG
Indus­trie­strasse 26
CH — 8207 Schaff­hausen

Client

Swiss Federal Insti­tute of Sport in Magg­lingen (EHSM)

To allow runners to train in bad weather, there is an indoor running track in a hall that can be set up and taken down as required.

Under the motto “Sporting and mental excel­lence in an inspi­ring envi­ron­ment”, athletes can take advan­tage of the offers of support from sports science thanks to the services available from the EHSM, as well as optimal trai­ning faci­li­ties at one and the same loca­tion. Indoor and outdoor sports venues, as well as seminar rooms, accom­mo­da­tion and cate­ring faci­li­ties are available for this purpose.

The NSM aims to offer the right equip­ment for prac­ti­cally every type of compe­ti­tive sport. In addi­tion to exten­sive outdoor faci­li­ties, it has a five-court hall, two three-court halls, three single court halls inclu­ding a fitness and weights room, and a fencing and squash hall.

Whether for volley­ball, clim­bing or dancing, the halls offer the right envi­ron­ment for almost every sport. To allow runners to train in bad weather, there is an indoor running track in a hall that can be set up and taken down as required.

This was to be comple­tely renewed. The new design should, of course, continue to meet all the demands of compe­ti­tive sport, i.e. a high-quality surface and bend eleva­tions of around one metre. The floo­ring must ther­e­fore, on the one hand, meet the requi­re­ments of World Athle­tics and Swiss Athle­tics and, on the other, weigh as little as possible – an ideal appli­ca­tion for CONIPUR SW.

The 13 mm-thick poly­ure­thane running track system with a PUR-bonded elastic layer compri­sing recy­cled rubber granules incor­po­rates both high quality and dura­bi­lity due to its 3 mm PUR top layer and is a great alter­na­tive to all-plastic floo­ring options. CONIPUR SW is easy on the joints and slip-resistant.

For use in the hall, the impact-sound insu­la­tion is also an advan­tage.

Besides its tech­nical proper­ties, the CONI­CA/­CO­NIPUR-Indoor Running Track was also able to host a convin­cing perfor­mance for the Federal Office when used in Prague. The contract for the instal­la­tion was awarded to Walo Bert­schinger AG from Gümligen, which had only just been named one of the “Best Employers in 2020” in Switz­er­land in February 2020.

Physical address

Eidge­nös­si­sche Hoch­schule für Sport Magg­lingen
Haupt­strasse 247
CH — 2532 Magg­lingen

Opening

2022

The running track – spanning approximately 1,000 m² – can be dismantled into 230 portable elements, which can then be assembled and taken down again with ease.

The sand­wich struc­ture proved bene­fi­cial for produc­tion. Since only a short time frame was available for the instal­la­tion at the NSM, the base­layer of the SW system was atta­ched to the wooden elements at the manu­fac­turer. The indi­vi­dual elements were then trans­ported to Magg­lingen, assem­bled on-site and coated with CONIPUR 210 blue.

The finished running track was finally sealed with CONIPUR 2200, which soli­di­fies the granu­lated surface of the floo­ring and also faci­li­tates clea­ning.

After the coating was finally cured, cutting could then begin at the joints between the indi­vi­dual elements. Coating the bends, in parti­cular, required a great deal of exper­tise, as these were set at compe­ti­tion level during proces­sing and had a corre­spon­dingly steep gradient. If this is not done carefully, the mate­rial can flow off.

However, the plan­ning proved to be successful. The running track – span­ning appro­xi­m­ately 1,000 m² – can be dismantled into 230 portable elements, which can then be assem­bled and taken down again with ease.

With it, the NSM can now offer optimal trai­ning options for indoor running under compe­ti­tive condi­tions.

Photos

Conica AG

Text

Julian Fernando Nadel
Conica AG
(Adver­to­rial)

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Frintrop Sports and Citizens’ Park

Frintrop Sports and Citizens’ Park

Let’s go!

Frintrop Sports and Citizens’ Park  is a meeting place for all generations, abilities and interests. 

The Frintrop Sports and Citizens’ Park promotes integration and creates space for socialising and participation.

The Frin­trop Sport and Citi­zens’ Park opened in Essen in October 2022. This forward-looking project is the result of the trans­for­ma­tion of a foot­ball ground into a versa­tile sports and leisure faci­lity of social and societal importance.

The faci­lity includes an outdoor hall with an arti­fi­cial grass playing field, a basket­ball court with a plastic surface, play, clim­bing and trend sports areas as well as open spaces for events and cele­bra­tions of all kinds.

With its faci­li­ties, the Frin­trop Sports and Citi­zens’ Park promotes inte­gra­tion and creates space for people to come toge­ther and parti­ci­pate.

When this former foot­ball ground was converted into a multi­func­tional sports and leisure faci­lity, high immis­sion control requi­re­ments had to be taken into account.

The McArena outdoor hall is certainly the most versatile offer in the Frintrop Sports and Citizens’ Park.

The park is run by the resi­dent SC Frin­trop 05/21, which was based on two clay sports grounds here three years ago. With the conver­sion of the first large sports ground into an arti­fi­cial turf pitch in the summer of 2020, the foot­ball future of the committed club was ensured with the motto “Inclu­sion. Inte­gra­tion. Coope­ra­tion. Future.”

The Frin­trop Sports and Citi­zens’ Park has now been built on the area of the second large sports ground – with barrier-free move­ment possi­bi­li­ties, adven­ture paths, lying areas, benches and various sports faci­li­ties.

The McArena outdoor hall is certainly the most versa­tile offer in the Frin­trop Sports and Citi­zens’ Park. Thanks to its canopy, the hall can be used all year round, and in the best condi­tions: in winter there is no snow on the playing field, in summer the athletes are in the shade, and on rainy days in the dry.

The technical equipment of the open-air hall is remarkable: digital scoreboard with time and goal counter, audio system controllable via Bluetooth and LED floodlight system.

The outdoor hall has an arti­fi­cial turf surface, which is also suitable for wheel­chair users. The revol­ving boards, the ball catching nets and the roof make the game fast and provide speed, commu­nity and a sense of achie­ve­ment.

This is also ensured by the versa­tile tech­nical equip­ment, which includes a perma­nently installed device measu­ring the speed of the shots on goal.

An indi­vi­du­ally controll­able digital score­board and an audio system can be controlled via Blue­tooth from any mobile phone for any form of acou­stic accom­p­animent – from an announce­ment that a car is incor­rectly parked to the beat for the Zumba course.

The flood­light system consists of energy-saving LED lights under the hall roof. This means that the hall can even be used in the dark.

Of course, the footballers of SC Frintrop are happy about the new hall. However, its versatility also makes it suitable for many other activities.

Another special feature of the hall is its adap­ta­bi­lity to the requi­re­ments of sound insu­la­tion. In Essen, two walls were closed for this reason. For people with visual impairm­ents, this design method can even be a benefit, because the sound feed­back improves their orien­ta­tion.

Of course, the foot­bal­lers of SC Frin­trop are also happy about the new hall. However, its versa­ti­lity also makes it suitable for many other acti­vi­ties – open sports and exer­cise offers, senior sports and gymnastics, girls’ dance lessons, taiji and qigong have been taking place since before the opening.

There will be groups and supervised training offers for practically all devices and playing fields, which will promote the success of the project.

Another high­light is the basket­ball arena. It’s not only acces­sible to wheel­chair users, but it’s also suitable for them thanks to the non-slip plastic cove­ring.

In this area of the Frin­trop Sports and Citi­zens’ Park , immis­sion control also played a major role, because the basket­ball arena is also located on a property boun­dary. Here, too, the plan­ners from Seeger Land­schafts­ar­chi­tektur have made a virtue out of neces­sity: the required sound­pro­ofing walls, which are more than five metres high, were desi­gned as gabions and are being expanded into a gene­rous clim­bing wall.

The boules court will certainly attract many older people. In addi­tion, there is a calis­the­nics complex, a tram­po­line field, wave running and parcours. The swing area has a net swing and equip­ment suitable for wheel­chair users, which promotes the inter­ac­tion of children with and without rest­ric­tions.

A beach volley­ball court and a func­tion buil­ding are still under cons­truc­tion. Both will be completed this year.

There will be groups and super­vised trai­ning offers for prac­ti­cally all devices and playing fields, which will promote the success of the project.

Frintrop Sports and Citizens’ Park  is a meeting place for all generations, abilities and interests. 

So the Frin­trop Sports and Citi­zens’ Park  is a meeting place for all gene­ra­tions, abili­ties and inte­rests. Thanks to the enormous commit­ment of the asso­cia­tion in the field of inclu­sion and the inte­gra­tion of refu­gees, an entire district and its social and societal deve­lo­p­ment can benefit here.

This is probably one of the main reasons why the Ruhr Confe­rence (which is an initia­tive of the NRW state govern­ment to streng­then the Ruhr area) is putting €1,500,000 into the “Frin­trop Sports and Citi­zens’ Park” project. The total cost is €2,000,000.

The park is open every day from 9 am to 9 pm and is freely acces­sible. Let’s go there!

Project data

Design

Seeger Land­schafts­ar­chi­tektur
Cyria­kusstr. 31 a
D — 41468 Neuss

Open-air hall

McArena GmbH
Karl-Ferdi­nand-Braun-Straße 3
D — 71522 Back­nang

Operator

SC Frin­trop 05/21 e.V.
Schem­manns­feld 29
D — 45359 Essen

Physical address

Sport- und Bürger­park Frin­trop
Schem­manns­feld 29
D — 45359 Essen

Opening

2022

Author

Johannes Bühl­be­cker
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McArenas Esslingen

The McArena open-air halls at the Sportpark Weil

Football and everything else

Open-air halls have a bright future — especially when they are as versatile as the McArenas Esslingen.

The two open-air halls are barrier-free and can be used in a variety of ways.

In the spring of 2022, two adja­cent open-air halls were opened in Esslingen am Neckar: one for foot­ball, the other for ever­y­thing else. They expand upon the Sport­park Weil’s already impres­sive offe­ring: foot­ball, fencing, tennis, bowling, dancing, health-focused or reha­bi­li­ta­tive sport, indoor and outdoor volley­ball – this is all possible here.

The two open-air halls are barrier-free and can be used in a variety of ways. They were built by McArena.

Users of the halls include the neigh­bou­ring clubs and schools, but also private groups, who can secure a time slot online. The state and the federal govern­ments supported the cons­truc­tion of the Esslingen McArenas by provi­ding 712,000 euros. This corre­sponds to 90 percent of the char­geable costs.

There is an increasing need for smaller, multifunctional facilities which can be accessed quickly and without membership.

The ongoing boom in open-air halls is a logical conse­quence of the way our sports beha­viour has changed.

The sport we want to do is beco­ming more and more nuanced and indi­vi­dual. Classic core sports venues need to evolve, and are doing so. There is an incre­asing need for smaller, multi­func­tional faci­li­ties which can be accessed quickly and also used without needing to be tied to the club or have member­ship.

Today’s open-air halls, like the Esslingen McArenas, are roofed, versa­tile sports fields that can be illu­mi­nated and which are tech­ni­cally very well equipped. However, their biggest advan­tage is that they allow us do sports outdoors all year round and to be protected by the roof from the wind and weather when doing so.

The two halls in Esslingen are the first to have solar panels installed and gree­nery planted on their roofs. The two halls are also extre­mely econo­mical: they do not require heating, are illu­mi­nated by LEDs, and are operated via a buil­ding auto­ma­tion system. Elec­tri­city is only consumed here when it is actually used.

The two open-air halls were designed from the outset to be barrier-free and were expressly conceived of for inclusive sports

The two open-air halls were desi­gned from the outset to be barrier-free and were expressly conceived of for inclu­sive sports. They are also used accor­dingly.

This is made possible by the 1.35-m-wide door openings on all sides and the place­ment of all opera­ting elements at hip height, or the use of wire­less opera­tion.

The two clubs FC Esslingen and SV 1845 Esslingen use the halls. In addi­tion, the surroun­ding schools, resi­dents, busi­nesses and social insti­tu­tions use the all-weather sports areas of the two open-air halls.

However, the digital opera­ting concept also enables private groups and commer­cial provi­ders to secure online time slots for the McArena.

Open-air halls have a bright future — especially when they are as versatile as the McArenas Esslingen.

The modern arti­fi­cial grass pitches are the centre­piece of the McArenas. They are ideal for most ball sports and exer­cise programmes. The circu­la­ting belts and ball nets make the game much faster and more intense. Above all, this elimi­nates the annoying task of having to fetch the ball.

The cons­truc­tion of the open-air halls consists of solid steel beams, while the roof cove­ring is made from trape­zo­idal metal sheets with anti-conden­sa­tion fleece. The roof surfaces of the two halls are each half covered with a photo­vol­taic system and exten­sive gree­nery.

The two halls have yet more extras to offer. These include LED lighting inte­grated into the roof, a digital display panel (which can be controlled via a button in the goal cross­bars), and a system for measu­ring the shoo­ting speed. The music system can be controlled via any smart­phone.

The concept and features of the Esslingen McArenas have also convinced poli­ti­cians. The state and federal govern­ments have ther­e­fore provided 712,000 euros of funding for this project. This corre­sponds to 90 percent of the char­geable costs.

Open-air halls are simply the future.

Project data

Open-air hall

McArena GmbH
Karl-Ferdi­nand-Braun-Straße 3
D — 71522 Back­nang

Physical address

Sport­park Weil
Weil­straße 199
D — 73733 Esslingen am Neckar

Opening

2022

Author

Johannes Bühl­be­cker
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McArena GmbH

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Sports and Culture Campus Gellerup

Sports and Culture Campus Gellerup

Rich in variety

Sports and Culture Campus Gellerup is the new heart of the district.

In Gellerup, parks, housing, 1,000 jobs — and the Sports and Cultural Campus Gellerup — have been built in the last ten years.

The Aarhus suburb of Gellerup has drama­ti­cally changed in the past ten years. The neigh­bour­hood has been totally trans­formed, several large blocks of flats have been demo­lished, and in their place a new and undu­la­ting urban park has been created, toge­ther with student accom­mo­da­tion, entre­pre­neu­rial envi­ron­ments and a muni­cipal power­house – Blixens – with 1,000 employees.

Sports and Culture Campus Gellerup is the new heart of the district.

A new library and a new commu­nity centre are located on Karen Blixens Boule­vard, and linked to a new purpose-built acti­vity centre. The vibe is clearly inter­na­tional, and the scale both impres­sive and enga­ging.

To provide the best acoustics in all configurations, the large communal space was equipped with Troldtekt acoustic panels in natural grey.

Sports and Culture Campus Gellerup comprises three very distinct buil­dings situated around a central square. The library and commu­nity centre has wooden facades, and is a very open and invi­ting buil­ding with strong ties to its surroun­dings.

Walking past, you can see what is happe­ning inside, which is a very good idea when you want to encou­rage new people to parti­ci­pate in the nume­rous acti­vi­ties.

Schon von außen ist erkennbar, was im Gebäude vor sich geht. Das animiert die Menschen, an den vielen Akti­vi­täten im Inneren teil­zu­nehmen.

The large communal space is a multi-purpose room featuring Trold­tekt acou­stic panels in natural grey – on both the walls and ceilings.

In a community as diverse as Gellerup, it is important that the new campus is a democratic place which is encouraging everyone to interact with other people.

The acti­vity centre to the south comes across as being more intro­verted, with large, smooth alumi­nium facades. However, through indi­vi­du­ally posi­tioned window sections it is possible to glimpse the enormous clim­bing walls, the main attrac­tion for Aarhus Clim­bing Club.
The buil­ding also houses attrac­tive trai­ning faci­li­ties for Circus Tværs, where children and young people can walk in off the street and learn advanced acro­ba­tics. To the east are the games pitches, the urban park and the swim­ming pool.
In the acti­vity centre, Trold­tekt acou­stic panels in blue, red and grey have been installed to give the room a sense of iden­tity while softening the concrete walls. In the foyer, black acou­stic panels have been installed on the ceiling, which go well with the trans­verse concrete beams and the artistic floor.

Project data

Client

Stadt Aarhus / Brab­rand Bolig­fo­rening

Acoustic panels

Trold­tekt GmbH
Frie­senweg 4 · Haus 12
D — 22763 Hamburg

Physical address

Sports- og Kultur­campus
Karen Blixens Blvd. 23 — 27
DK — 8220 Brab­rand

Opening

2021

Author

Thomas Mølvig, Archi­tekt
(Adver­to­rial)

Photograph

Thomas Mølvig, Archi­tekt.

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